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Cerrado farm community fights for life against dam and eucalyptus growers

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer A wealth of great rivers caused Brazil in recent years to pursue a frenzy of mega-dam construction in the Amazon and Cerrado, work that enthusiasts claimed would benefit Brazilians with cheap energy. Critics say otherwise, however, noting much of the power produced goes to large mining company operations.Analysts also point to completed projects, such as the Belo Monte, Teles Pires, Santo Antonio, Jirau and other dams, that have resulted in significant environmental harm, the displacement of rural indigenous and traditional populations, and to generating massive corruption.A case in point can be found in the small town of Formosa in Tocantins state. The building of the Estreito mega-dam, completed in 2008, flooded fields, pastures and homes. The most impacted half of the community was relocated by the consortium of companies that constructed the dam.The rest remained and were denied the social and economic benefits they’d been promised by either the government or the dam building consortium, which includes two mining giants, Alcoa and Vale, and Suez Energy and Camargo Corrêa Energia. Many Brazilian mega-dams were planned to offer energy to large mines. Aerial view of the Estreito dam on the Tocantins river. Formosa residents are still waiting to be given compensation promised them by the dam-building consortium and the government. Image by Cleber Magri licensed under a CC 4.0 license.This is the seventh in a series by journalist Anna Sophie Gross who traveled to the Brazilian states of Tocantins and Maranhão in Legal Amazonia for Mongabay to assess the impacts of agribusiness on the region’s environment and people.FORMOSA, Tocantins, Brazil – The tiny settlement, or rather, what remains of it, sits on the border between Maranhão and Tocantins state, and it is steeped in a history of conflict. Its sixty families, now diminished to 29, have fought the government, a consortium of mining and energy companies, and local eucalyptus plantations for more than a decade to keep the rights to a parcel of land that they can till and live upon.Founded in 2002 with a valid land deed, Formosa had roughly four good years in which to cultivate crops, rear livestock, put down roots and weave together a strong community fabric based upon friendship and mutual dependency.In 2007, the Formosa families were suddenly confronted with an existential threat to their homes and livelihoods.Despite great protest from people in the region and environmental activists, the Estreito hydroelectric dam was built on the Tocantins River, just 40 kilometers (25 miles) downstream from Formosa.Some speculate that the dam was built primarily to provide electricity to mining operations, though officially the energy is distributed to the national grid. Either way, its reservoir filled and flooded half of Formosa’s titled territory. In 2008, the year the dam went operational, thirty of the families were relocated by the consortium of mining companies that constructed the dam and profit from it to this day. Those whose homes were not directly flooded, but who lost farmland, remained.“We lost our friends, but we also lost access to water [and] to the areas we used to plant crops and to the river beach,” explained Maria Helena de Souza, the community’s leader.Before the dam, Formosa’s river beach had been a popular destination for local people who gathered there to swim and lounge on sunny days. That afforded the community with a business opportunity, selling fruit and snacks to the beachgoers. Local women would also pluck nuts from babaçu trees near the river shore and make oil, which they’d sell locally.The beach and all the babaçu were drowned by the dam’s reservoir, washing away two steady streams of income.Maria Helena de Souza, Formosa’s leader, looks out over the land that has been flooded by the Estreito dam: “We lost our friends, but we also lost access to water [and] to the areas we used to plant crops and to the river beach.” Image by Thomas Bauer.Babacu trees flooded in the Formosa community. Local women used to pluck nuts from babaçu trees near the river shore and make oil, which they’d sell locally. The babaçu trees were drowned by the dam’s reservoir, washing away a steady stream of community income. Image by Thomas Bauer.Unkept pledgesThe relocated were taken to new homes 150 kilometers (93 miles) away. Those that remained in Formosa were promised the same amenities that their departed friends had received – clean drinking water, proper sanitation, improved access roads. But it has been a decade since the dam became operational; nothing has materialized.The initial reparations agreement was made between the community and the Consortium of Hydroelectric Energy in Estreito (CESTE) – the coalition of energy companies that built the dam – and the federal National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA).“We received nothing, nothing, nothing. Not money, or the services they promised they would provide,” said de Souza. She pointed to a water pump that it took CESTE 5 years to install but which has never functioned.“They had the nerve to try to host an inauguration ceremony for the pump, but we wouldn’t let them celebrate something that doesn’t work,” she said. That was four years ago, and since then no one has come to repair the broken pump.The reason for the stalemate comes in the form of a disagreement over whose responsibility it is to provide Formosa with its guaranteed reparations. The superintendent of INCRA in Tocantins, Carlos Alberto da Costa, flatly denies INCRA’s accountability: “It is CESTE’s responsibility to supply all of these things,” he said. “It’s not our responsibility to make CESTE hold up their end of the agreement.”But CESTE told Mongabay a different story, stating that it did not have any responsibility for the promises made within the agreement. “We note that the implementation of the UHE ESTREITO [dam] occurred with absolute dialogue and respect for the community and government institutions,” CESTE representatives said.However, it seems likely that both government and consortium share in the responsibility. In the case of other Brazilian mega-dams, such as with Belo Monte on the Xingu River, it is the dam building consortium that is accountable for paying reparations, while it is the government’s responsibility under the law to make sure that happens.But at Formosa, the deadlock remains, and the community suffers on, mostly in silence and so far without legal recourse.A Formosa neighbor, 73 year-old eucalyptus farmer Ataide Vas do Santos, seen inside one of his plantations. “The eucalyptus hasn’t had any effect on communities around here,” he says. But Formosa residents tell a different story, of extreme water shortages due to the trees’ excessive water use and pesticide-contaminated streams. Image by Thomas Bauer.Enter the speculators The dam’s reservoir is just one of Formosa’s survival worries. Large eucalyptus plantations, “green deserts” devoid of biodiversity, and an egg farm, surround the community today.And there is no shortage of entrepreneurial representatives looking to buy up the settlement’s remaining land along the river to gain access to irrigation water. Many residents have received low purchase offers from agribusiness – tempting nonetheless for those whose subsistence livelihoods and sources of income have been deeply curtailed by the dam.“Our quality of life here’s gotten so bad, which means more and more people are thinking of selling out and moving on,” said de Souza. “It’s weakening us.”The village leader still dreams of a future where Formosa will regain its vibrancy and culture. She hopes that the community will someday be able to build a school to provide its young people with education and hope. She also yearns for a working water pump so residents no longer need to drink polluted river water.The Estreito dam and reservoir. Completed in 2008, the dam flooded fields, pastures and homes. The most impacted half of the Formosa community was relocated by the consortium of companies that constructed the dam, but the rest goes uncompensated for the reservoir’s flooding. Image by Thomas Bauer.How the dam came to beAnyone crossing the President Juscelino Kubistchek bridge over the Tocantins River six years ago would have seen a much more pastoral scene. Where once there was forest and a few scattered homes, now stands one of the biggest hydroelectric complexes in Brazil, generating 1,087 megawatts (MW).But the construction of the Estreito dam didn’t only change the look of the countryside. It also changed the character of the nearby city of Estreito, as hotels, restaurants, gas stations, a concert hall and other amenities sprang up to meet the demands of newly arrived construction workers, there to build the dam, transmission lines, roads and other infrastructure.It had all begun with a lengthy federal bidding process. Then, on July 12, 2002, Suez Energy, Camargo Corrêa Energia, Vale and Alcoa – two of the world’s mining giants – were awarded the lucrative hydroelectric project. The companies organized the CESTE consortium, which planned and constructed the Estreito Dam, and which operates and profits from it today.A railroad track, built for freight transport in 2010, cut straight through Formosa, causing further community disruption. Formosa leader Maria Helena de Souza stands on the trestle. Behind her are dead Babacu trees and drowned community lands: “Our quality of life here’s gotten so bad, which means more and more people are thinking of selling out and moving on. It’s weakening us.” Image by Thomas Bauer.A business-biased building process?Some commentators have identified troubling aspects to the construction on this, the biggest, high-impact energy project of its kind in Maranhão state.In a doctoral thesis, Adila Maria Taveira de Lima, of the Federal University of Tocantins, writes that the building process “was marked by the [consortium’s] rush to finish the work and obtain return on investment.” She adds that this haste resulted in “extreme government influence being used to expedite the work and put pressure on licensing bodies to issue licenses.” All consortiums awarded large federal infrastructure construction projects are compelled under the law to conduct socio-environmental impact assessments, which require the full participation and input of potentially impacted communities.However, de Lima says that CESTE’s negotiation meetings were barely participatory. Instead, the consortium cherry-picked supportive representatives from each group of impacted parties, rather than allowing the groups to self-select their own representatives. She concludes that final “decisions reached the affected communities without [residents] having the opportunity to make any significant changes.”According to another qualitative study conducted in 2012 by Amarildo Silva Araujo, also from Tocantins Federal University, local communities endured a wide range of negative impacts caused by the dam – among them, the death and displacement of thousands of animals, cost of living increases, as well as micro-climatic disturbances.The study author writes that all of his interviewees felt they were “significantly impacted by the establishment of the Estreito Hydroelectric Power Plant, and point out that none of the impacts were properly monitored by those in charge of construction.”Silva Araujo concludes that the environmental impact assessment carried out ahead of construction failed to adequately anticipate the social and environmental harm that the dam would cause, and that there were serious failures on CESTE’s part to uphold reparations commitments made to river-dwelling populations.Such failings, say critics, are a hallmark of Brazilian mega-dam projects, with similar accusations launched against the Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, the Santo Antonio and Jirau dams on the Madeira River, a series of dams on the Teles Pires River, and others.CESTE presents a different picture, celebrating its positive impact in Maranhão. In a statement sent to Mongabay, the company said that the consortium invested more than $75 million reals  (US $20 million) in projects to improve social and health infrastructure in the region, and that 90 percent of its dealings with homeowners who were impacted by the dam were “conducted in a friendly manner.”The consortium also claims that the construction of the dam generated 10,000 jobs, albeit temporary ones. CESTE does admit that now that the dam is operational, the hydroelectric project employs just 300 personnel.An aerial view of the train track that cuts directly through Formosa and which is used to transport steel across Brazil. Image by Thomas Bauer.Damming the Cerrado to support miningA series of huge hydroelectric dams have already been built along the Parnaiba, Tocantins, and Estreito rivers in Maranhão – the Brazilian state with the second lowest GDP in the nation.Plans for six new dams on the Tocantins River, means that Maranhão is poised to become among the highest energy producing states in all of Brazil, ultimately generating 11.6 million MW, almost ten times the amount the state currently uses.Maranhão presently consumes just 1.5 million megawatts, including that generated by the Estreito dam. But according to Araujo’s research, almost two thirds of that amount is utilized by a single corporate enterprise – the Alumar Consortium, which refines and sells aluminum and is made up of three major transnational mining companies, Alcoa, South 32 and Alcan. It’s important to note that Alcoa is also one of the main companies in the CESTE consortium. The mining and processing of aluminum requires a tremendous amount of energy, so the proposed new dams seem intended to serve a potential massive increase in bauxite mining and aluminum processing.“There are studies which show that dams have been constructed to produce energy specifically for certain major industries,” said Dernival Ramos Junior, Professor of History, Society and Territory at the Federal University of Tocantins.He explained that the popular view that mega-dams bring economic development to the nation and benefits to the general population is a potent one with the Brazilian populace, but that it is “simply untrue.” He adds that, “The option to construct dams is political, and is very tied to the interests of big corporations.”According to CESTE’s website, the Estreito dam has “the capacity to supply energy to a city with four million inhabitants” which “represents more energy and development for Brazil and the region where the plant is located.”However, with Maranhão shooting for a ten million megawatt surplus of hydroelectric energy over what the state consumes, it is clear that much will be exported to other states, most of them richer and unperturbed by the social and environmental impacts that these mega-projects cause to rural populations in the Cerrado. It’s also clear that much of the exported electricity would likely benefit transnational mining companies like Alcoa, or giant Brazilian mining companies like Vale. The value of these big dams to the general public is less clear.Formosa residents prepare cassava flour, a staple in the Brazilian national diet, usually served alongside beans and meat. The coming of the dam, the reservoir, the eucalyptus plantations, and the railroad have all disrupted the farming community’s livelihoods and subsistence lifestyle. Image by Thomas Bauer.The future of hydraulic power in BrazilBrazil is a land famous for its great rivers, with eight percent of the world’s freshwater found there. So it’s logical for government, industry and agribusiness to want to harness this cheap and abundant source of energy.Brazil’s first dam was built in 1889 in Minas Gerais state, though the sudden proliferation of Brazilian hydroelectric dams can be traced to the policies of President Juscelino Kubitschek (1956-61), a proponent of post-World War II industrialization.An explosion in mega-dam construction arrived in recent years, also resulting in a significant socio-environmental backlash, which even halted construction in a few ultra-controversial cases, including the defeat – at least for now – of the 8,000 MW São Luiz do Tapajós dam on the Tapajós River in the Amazon basin in 2016.There have even been whisperings of an end to the contentious mega-dam construction craze, with a shift to medium and small dams (though even these can be dangerously ecologically disruptive), and to renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar.Philip Fearnside, a specialist in Amazonian dams, isn’t hopeful. “Dams are still very much the center piece of Brazil’s electricity generation plans,” he told Mongabay. Fearnside points out that, to date, none of the dams on the government’s ten-year plan have been de-listed, while two top officials who positioned themselves against hydroelectric megaprojects resigned abruptly earlier this year.Fearnside notes that Chinese state-owned companies have been buying up Brazilian dams and transmission lines, and are negotiating for the purchase of others. Chinese investment banks and construction companies are also active in promoting major Brazilian transportation infrastructure projects, including new industrial waterways that would require dams, railways and roads, that could soon bring Brazilian commodities more easily and cheaply to Asia.There are also a host of pending legislative proposals in Congress that could massively weaken environmental licensing, making dam construction significantly easier and cheaper in the future.Among the troubling bills now in the legislature is PLS 654/2015 which calls for the creation of a fast-tracked environmental license, which would take just eight months to obtain, for infrastructure projects of “strategic importance” to the government. The strategic importance label is sufficiently vague to be slapped on a host of projects.PL 447/2012, dubbed the “Corruption Bill” by critics, would prohibit the suspension or cancellation of infrastructure projects once they have already begun, and also restrict the power of oversight bodies, such as the Public Prosecutor’s Office and even the judiciary, from intervening in cases of malpractice.Newly elected president Jair Bolsonaro, who takes office in January, has indicated his support for fast-tracking the infrastructure licensing process. Retired general Oswaldo Ferreira, in charge of infrastructure planning for Bolsonaro’s campaign, also recently suggested reopening feasibility studies for the São Luiz do Tapajós mega-dam, in Pará, and resuming analyses for proposed Amazon hydropower dams with large reservoirs. Ferreira favors wind and solar energy, but feels neither are sufficient to “keep the economy growing.”Fearnside is categorical about what he thinks needs to happen next. “Dam construction should be stopped and priority given to using less electricity,” he said. Then it is time for Brazil to shift its focus to wind and solar power. That’s a move that the residents of Formosa ­– feeling cheated out of hydropower’s promise – would almost surely applaud.Mongabay contributor Anna Sophie Gross was accompanied on her trip by Thomas Bauer, a photographer and filmmaker who has been documenting and supporting communities in the Cerrado and Amazon for over 20 years. He produced nearly all of the photos and videos for this series.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Conflict, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corruption, Dams, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, environmental justice, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Featured, Flooding, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Law, Mining, Rainforest Mining, Regulations, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Tall and old or dense and young: Which kind of forest is better for the climate?

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Logging, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Temperate Forests, Tropical Forests Paul Koberstein and Jessica Applegate are editors of Cascadia Times, an environmental journal based in Portland, Oregon. Scientists say reforestation and better forest management can provide 18 percent of climate change mitigation through 2030. But studies appear to be divided about whether it’s better to prioritize the conservation of old forests or the replanting of young ones.A closer look, however, reconciles these two viewpoints. While young forests tend to absorb more carbon overall because trees can be crowded together when they’re small, a tree’s carbon absorption rate accelerates as it ages. This means that forests comprised of tall, old trees – like the temperate rainforests of North America’s Pacific coast – are some of the planet’s biggest carbon storehouses.But when forests are logged, their immense stores of carbon are quickly released. A study found the logging of forests in the U.S. state of Oregon emitted 33 million tons of CO2 – almost as much as the world’s dirtiest coal plant.Researchers are calling on industry to help buffer climate change by doubling tree harvest rotations to 80 years, and urge government agencies managing forests to impose their own harvest restrictions. In 2007, Richard Branson, the British business magnate, offered a $25 million prize to anyone who can invent a device capable of removing significant volumes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.Andy Kerr, a noted Oregon environmentalist, drew a picture of a tree and sent it in. After all, a tree performs the job of sucking carbon out of the air far better than any technology yet devised by humans. But Kerr didn’t win, foiled by contest rules specifying the winner must be the inventor of such a device, and it’s certain neither Kerr nor anyone else invented the tree. An artificial tree might win if it could perform the implausible feat of inhaling CO2.Kerr’s idea, however, was rooted more in the climate benefits provided by an entire forest rather than just a single tree. These benefits can be enormous, according to “Natural Climate Solutions,” a paper published in 2017 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The paper asserts better management of forests, wetlands and farmland can provide 37 percent of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed through 2030. Forests alone can provide 18 percent of the mitigation, according to a statement published last year by the Climate and Land Alliance and signed by an international group of 40 scientists.“The ‘natural technology’ of forests is currently the only proven means of removing and storing atmospheric CO2 at a scale that can meaningfully contribute to achieving carbon balance,” the 40 scientists said. “The world’s forests contain more carbon than exploitable oil, gas, and coal deposits, hence avoiding forest carbon emissions is just as urgent as halting fossil fuel use.”The Amazon Rainforest is one of the world’s most important carbon sinks.Last year, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned we have only until 2030 to act if we hope to limit global warming to moderate levels.Forests cool the atmosphere by inhaling CO2 through the process of photosynthesis and storing or sequestering it in roots, trunks, branches, needles and leaves. Half a tree’s weight is carbon. Although every backyard vegetable garden absorbs some amount of carbon, a rainforest takes in exponentially more. For this reason, rainforests and other large terrestrial ecosystems made up of dense vegetation are known as “carbon sinks.”Kerr lives at the edge of a temperate rainforest straddling the west coast of North America from the redwoods of Northern California into Alaska, the largest contiguous temperate rainforest in the world. Few ecosystems anywhere match its capacity to absorb and store carbon. Trees in the temperate rainforest, among the tallest in the world, live for 800 years or more.The expansive Amazon tropical rainforest of South America is one of the world’s largest carbon sinks. But on a per-acre basis, the Amazon is not nearly as efficient at absorbing carbon as the coastal temperate rainforest. The Douglas fir forests of Oregon and the hemlock and cedar forests of Alaska store about twice as much carbon per acre as the Amazon. The giant redwoods of Northern California, which store seven times as much, are regarded as the most carbon dense forests in the world.The temperate rainforest is a “carbon storage powerhouse,” says John Talberth of the Portland, Ore.-based advocacy group Center for a Sustainable Economy (CSE). “If allowed to mature, Pacific Northwest forests can capture and store more carbon than almost any terrestrial ecosystem on Earth.”Pound-for-pound, North America’s temperate rainforests – like this one on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington – beat tropical rainforests when it comes to carbon storage.The problem is most mature trees in the rainforest have been cut down and young ones are not allowed to mature. Outside conservation areas like national parks and wilderness, ancient groves are converted to industrial tree farms by the timber industry.After cutting down every old growth tree it can get its hands on, the industry typically plants a young sapling in its place. The saplings grow for about 40 years on average until the next harvest. Then the cycle repeats again and again.This business model might be good for timber industry profits, but what does it do to the climate?Sara Duncan, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Forest Industry Council, a lobbying group, claims this business model is good for both profits and the climate. She says old growth trees store a lot of carbon, but like everything else, old growth trees eventually die. If they aren’t harvested and converted into wood products, they will fall down in a windstorm, burn up in a wildfire or meet their fate some other way. Eventually they will release all their stored carbon content back to the atmosphere.The industry’s solution to the climate crisis is to log the trees, truck them to the mill, and store the carbon in 2-by-4s, plywood boards and toilet paper. Eventually, however, the carbon in these products will still return to the atmosphere one day.But is there a more climate-friendly way to manage our forests? Can we get more climate mitigation from a forest if we don’t cut it down every 40 years? The science suggests we can.In 2014, a study published in Nature by a team an international team of researchers led Nathan Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the United States Geographical Survey, found that a typical tree’s growth continues to accelerate throughout its lifetime, which in the coastal temperate rainforest can be 800 years of more.Stephenson and his team compiled growth measurements of 673,046 trees belonging to 403 tree species from tropical, subtropical and temperate regions across six continents. They found that the growth rate for most species “increased continuously” as they aged.“This finding contradicts the usual assumption that tree growth eventually declines as trees get older and bigger,” Stephenson says. “It also means that big, old trees are better at absorbing carbon from the atmosphere than has been commonly assumed.”This giant cedar sucked in a lot of carbon during its 1,000-year life. Photo by Morgan Erickson-Davis.But the science, as usual, is muddy. As Mongabay reported in February, a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2019 by Thomas Pugh of the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research in the UK found young forests sequester more carbon per year than old-growth forests.“These findings upend conventional wisdom that old-growth tropical rainforests are the planet’s biggest carbon sinks,” Pugh’s study said. It defined old-growth forests as any stand over 140 years of age.It would appear the two studies contradict each other. But both scientists say they are consistent.“The difference is that Stephenson et al. looked at biomass of individual trees, whereas our study looks at biomass of whole stands of trees,” Pugh said in an email. “Whilst a single tree might continue to pile on more and more biomass, there will be less of such trees in a stand, simply because of their size and as tree stands age, gaps tend to appear due to tree mortality.”“So, our conclusion is actually that young forests are responsible for more of the terrestrial carbon sink than old growth forests,” Pugh said.“Both things are true,” Stephenson said in an email. “Individual tree mass growth rate increases with tree size, but old forests usually absorb carbon more slowly than young forests.”However, the relative growth rates of young and old trees do not tell the entire story.“Older forests store a lot more carbon than young forests and much of it is returned to the atmosphere quickly when harvested and planted with young trees,” says Beverly Law, a professor of global change biology at Oregon State University.By the time it becomes a desk, table or 2-by-4, a log will lose about 70 percent of its carbon, according to Dominick DellaSala, director of the GEOS Institute, an environmental think tank based in Oregon.About 45 percent of the carbon is left on the forest floor, said DellaSala, a member of the Oregon Global Warming Commission Task Force on Forest Carbon. “This includes decomposition of root wads, branches, and tops remaining on site and a little soil carbon. Logging takes nearly half the carbon and puts it into the atmosphere within years.”Trees that fall naturally release their carbon gradually over decades as they decompose.Another 25 percent is lost during manufacturing, he said. And as the finished wood products decay over time, he said, they emit even more.And that doesn’t include carbon emitted by chainsaws, logging trucks and lathes. In 2018, Law led a team of researchers who quantified these and all other carbon emissions as logs move from forest to sawmill. Their paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said logging operations in Oregon contribute an average of 33 million tons of CO2 to the air. This equates to almost as much as the world’s dirtiest coal plant, Taichung Coal Plant in Taiwan, which emits about 36 million tons per year.Moreover, the climate impacts of logging are even greater if you factor in a harvested log’s lost future growth opportunities, Law says. Although her paper makes no attempt to quantify a logged tree’s foregone climate mitigation potential, she acknowledges it could be significant.Law called on the industry to help buffer climate change by doubling harvest rotations to 80 years and urged government agencies managing forests to impose their own harvest restrictions. These and other actions could increase the amount of carbon absorbed by Oregon forests by 56 percent by the year 2100, as well as improve water quality and biodiversity, her paper said. She is conducting a similar analysis for forests in California and Washington.Even after the wood is converted into a wood product, the carbon will likely return to the atmosphere sooner than people might think, Law said.“Old growth trees in the coastal temperate rainforest can sequester carbon for hundreds of years,” she said, “which is much longer than is expected for buildings that are generally assumed to outlive their usefulness or be replaced within several decades.”center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Insurers spend less on solo plans

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’People with individual policies paid 59 percent of their health expenses out-of-pocket, compared to 34 percent for those with an employer-sponsored policy, the study found. The study examined data from The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2000 to 2003. The survey is conducted by the federal government, and receives data on health services, expenditures and insurance from families, individuals, medical providers and employers. Claxton said the 2004 data only recently became available and that there is no reason to think the trends have shifted. The Kaiser study also found that 42.8 percent of those with individual polices said they were in excellent health, compared to 35.1 percent of people in employer-sponsored plans. Claxton said the reported better health of people in individual plans may contribute to the lower premiums in such plans. NEW YORK – Health insurers spend less on patients with individual policies than those with employer-sponsored plans, according to a new study released Friday. Patients with individual policies also have higher out-of-pocket expenses than their counterparts who purchase plans through their employers, said the study by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation found. Individual health policies may carry low premiums but people need to understand that sometimes the plans are inexpensive because they don’t offer very rich benefits, said Gary Claxton, a vice president at the foundation and author of the study. The study found that an insurer spends an average of $765 annually on an individual between the ages of 18 and 34 who has bought his own policy but spends $1,174 on a person in the same age range in an employer-sponsored plan. Similarly, insurers spend an average of $942 annually on a person between the ages of 35 and 49 with an individual plan compared to $1,622 on someone in the same age range with an employer-sponsored plan. Spending on each group was less if the policy didn’t include vision or dental coverage. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

HRH Prince Michael of Kent Tours Health and Educational Facilities

first_imgHis Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent arrived in Jamaica on Monday, April 15, at the invitation of the National Road Safety Council (NRSC) which is celebrating its 20th anniversary. He was greeted by several state officials, including State Minister in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Hon. Arnaldo Brown. [See more images of the arrival of HRH Prince Michael of Kent] On his arrival, Chairman of the NRSC, Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller issued a message welcoming Prince Michael. “On behalf of the NRSC, and indeed of all Jamaicans, I would like to express our gratitude to His Royal Highness for joining us in our vital work to make Jamaica’s roads safe for all,” the Prime Minister said. As part of his working visit to the island, Prince Michael toured the Sir John Golding Rehabilitation Centre in Mona and the Mona GeoInformatics Institute at the University of the West Indies on Tuesday, April 16. At the Sir John Golding Rehabilitation Centre, His Royal Highness visited the wards, physiotheraphy department and prosthesis workshop. The work of the rehabilitation centre, which plays a pivotal role in the rehabilitation of many road crash survivors, is of great interest to Prince Michael who is Patron for The Commission for Global Road Safety. [RELATED: HRH Prince Michael of Kent Special Page] The late Sir John Golding, in whose honour the institution was named, was an orthopaedic surgeon who played a pioneering role in road safety research in Jamaica and served as a founding Vice Chairman of the NRSC. During a brief ceremony at the Sir John Golding Rehabilitation Centre, the Prince unveiled a plaque in commemoration of his visit to the institution. He also spoke to members of the Jamaica Paralympic team. On his tour of the Mona GeoInformatics Institute (MGI), HRH was treated to a presentation by MGI Director, Dr. Parris Lyew-Ayee, on the work the institute has done regarding road crashes and the creation of a Road Safety Institute at MGI. TThe Prince will be in the island until Friday April 19. His Royal Highness, who serves as the Royal Patron of the Commission for Global Road Safety, will present the NRSC with the prestigious Prince Michael International Road Safety Awards, in recognition of its work over the past two decades.last_img read more

Nipissing First Nation mulls banning cannabis sales ahead of legalization

first_imgAnnette FrancisAPTN NewsRecreational cannabis will soon be legal in Canada.Although the legislation is still being sorted out across the provinces, some First Nations in Ontario are trying to get ahead of the game, while others are holding off.APTN’s Annette Francis visited Nipissing First Nation to hear how that community is planning to deal with [email protected]last_img

Lifeless Body of 7YearOld Girl Washes Up On Arawak Cay Beach

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, June 3, 2017 – Nassau – The lifeless body of 7 year-old Elnora Lezette Bullard was found on the shores of Arawak Cay Beach in Nassau.The 7 year-old of Family Street, New Providence, was reported missing shortly before 7:00pm yesterday, by family members following a beach picnic at the eastern end of Arawak Cay.Her body washed up on the shores of the beach today. It is not known as yet if Elnora was left unsupervised at the time of her disappearance yesterday.#magneticmedianews#lifelessbodyof7yearoldfound Related Items:#lifelessbodyof7yearoldfound, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

San Diego Sheriffs Department recruiting station at Miramar Air Show

first_imgSan Diego Sheriff’s Department recruiting station at Miramar Air Show September 27, 2018 MIRAMAR (KUSI) – If you want to be apart of the great work the San Diego Sheriff’s Department does for our communities, you have the chance to apply this weekend.San Diego Sheriff Department’s Human Resource Manager, Michael Alvarado, told us all about it on Good Morning San Diego. Posted: September 27, 2018 Jason Austell, Jason Austell Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Forbes BrandVoice Accounts for 20 Percent of Total Advertising Revenue

first_imgWith all the focus on native advertising as a viable source of digital ad revenue for publishers, Forbes has leant an element of legitimacy with the announcement that its BrandVoice platform is projected to account for 20 percent of all ad revenues in 2013, a 10 percent jump from last year.BrandVoice, which launched three years ago as AdVoice, is a big-ticket service that allows brands to contribute ad-labeled content that, if it works right, behaves the same way editorial content does. It appears in the same content streams and gets bumped to ‘most popular’ content modules and social trending lists if it performs well. So far, it appears advertisers are liking what they see. There will be a dozen new BrandVoice ads appearing by the end of the year, and Forbes is predicting the custom-branded content will rise to 30 percent of all ad revenue by 2014. Traffic in August was up to almost 25 million unique visitors and, says the company, digital passed print for the first time this year, accounting for 53 percent of ad revenues versus print’s 47 percent.The program now includes a newly-launched analytics dashboard that lets marketers track the performance of their content across the site and on social networks.last_img read more

VIDEO Wilmington Conservation Agent Discusses Wetlands  Permitting

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Jonathan Parker and Sharon Kelley-Parrella, of the Parker and Kelley Team at RE/MAX ENCORE, have launched a new show on WCTV called “Real Estate Talks.”In their fifth episode, Parker and Kelley-Parrella continue their interview Wilmington Conservation Agent Ryan Hale on wetlands and permitting.Watch the 21-minute episode, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/c/0/b/6/9/2/c0b69219-fb89-4762-9384-1eeaa51e2c821544041851.751%2B48824550.794%40castus4-wilmington%2B15440447751544044118053886.vod.720p.20181205_Real_Estate_Talks_Ryan_Hale_Continued.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/c/0/b/6/9/2/c0b69219-fb89-4762-9384-1eeaa51e2c821544041851.751%2B48824550.794%40castus4-wilmington%2B15440447751544044118053886.vod.720p.20181205_Real_Estate_Talks_Ryan_Hale_Continued.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email [email protected] You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Learn What Homeowners Should Know About Wetlands & A Wilmington Housing Market UpdateIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch Debut Episode Of ‘Real Estate Talks,’ Get Wilmington Market Update & Tips On Home BuyingIn “Videos”VIDEO: Get Tips On The Home Selling Process & A Wilmington Housing Market UpdateIn “Videos”last_img read more

Firefox cant protect against political manipulation on Facebook Mozilla complains

first_img Tags Privacy Facebook Share your voice Post a comment 0 Mozilla Chief Operations Officer Denelle Dixon Stephen Shankland/CNET Mozilla has joined the list of organizations displeased with Facebook’s new restrictions on outsiders analyzing political ads, lodging a complaint with European regulators that the move blocks its plan to help people understand who’s trying to influence them during coming elections. “Transparency cannot just be on the terms with which the world’s largest, most powerful tech companies are most comfortable,” said Denelle Dixon, Mozilla’s chief operations officer, in a letter Thursday to Mariya Gabriel, the European Commission’s leader for digital economy and society. Facebook should open a programming interface immediately that will let any researcher or organization build tools to help people “understand and therefore resist targeted disinformation campaigns.” Mozilla’s voice joins those of ProPublica and WhoTargetsMe, which earlier this week made similar objections when Facebook limited their abilities. The complaints come during a tough time for Facebook, which last year was battered by the Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal and now is grappling with a controversial Facebook Research app that paid people $20 a month to see how they used phones and the web. And Facebook’s attempt to restore faith after social media manipulation during the 2016 US election isn’t over, either: Facebook said Thursday it removed 783 pages that it said Iran used to try to influence elections in other countries. Facebook said the Mozilla difficulties arose because it’s trying to block ways outsiders can get unauthorized access to people’s information, including tools that block ads or scrape ads. But Facebook’s move means the social network isn’t fulfilling the requirements of the European Code of Practice on Disinformation, an industry effort at self-regulation that went into effect in September, Mozilla’s Dixon said. The simple keyword search available with Facebook’s Ad Archive tool “has design limits that prevent more sophisticated research and trend analysis on the political ads,” Mozilla said, and doesn’t comply with the code. The result is that Facebook is hobbling Mozilla’s tool called Ad Analysis for Facebook for Firefox users who want to find out who’s trying to pull their strings during the European Union’s parliamentary elections. Cambridge Analytica: Everything you need to know about Facebook’s data mining scandal.CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET’s newsstand edition. Internet Services Mobile Appslast_img read more

Maharshi digital and satellite rights sold Did it fail to beat Mahesh

first_imgMaharshiDirector Vamsi Paidipally’s Maharshi starring Mahesh Babu and Pooja Hegde has fetched Rs 27.80 crore from the sale of its digital and satellite rights but failed to beat the record of Bharat Ane Nenu (BAN).Maharshi is Mahesh Babu’s landmark 25th movie, which has doubled the curiosity and expectations about the film. Mahesh Babu’s popularity and hype generated by its promos have created a lot of demand for various rights of the movie. Several business houses are in the race to acquire its rights.Maharshi is scheduled for its worldwide release on May 9. The latest we hear is that the makers have already sold its digital and TV rights a month ahead of its release. Amazon Prime Video has bagged its digital rights for a whopping price of Rs 11 crore. Gemini TV has acquired its satellite rights for Rs 16.8 crore. The movie has fetched a total of Rs 27.80 crore for its makers from the sale of these rights.According to the latest reports, Mahesh Babu’s previous release Bharat Ane Nenu fetched a whopping amount of Rs 38 crore from the sale of its non-theatrical rights. It was reported that its satellite and digital and Hindi dubbing rights have received Rs 22 crore, Rs 11 crore and Rs 5 crore, respectively. MaharshiTwitterConsidering the huge hype, Maharshi was expected to beat the record of Bharat Ane Nenu. The prices its digital rights are equal to the other film and the details of its Hindi dubbing rights are not available. But the price of its satellite rights is much lower than that of 2018 hit movie. The people in the industry are wondering over whether the makers really sold its TV rights for a lower price.Maharshi is produced by C Ashwini Dutt, Dil Raju and Prasad V Potluri, under the banners of Vyjayanthi Movies, Sri Venkateswara Creations and PVP Cinema. The makers have shelled out Rs 65 crore on its production and it has already recovered them nearly 50 per cent of their investments. The movie is expected to fetch them over Rs 100 crore from the sale of its theatrical rights and Hindi dubbing rights.last_img read more

Jason Roy out of World Cup Another injury scare for England

first_imgJason Roy is a very important member of the English ODI teamReutersAfter England opener Alex Hales declared taking an ‘indefinite break’ from cricket due to ‘personal reasons,’ another opener of the side was feared to be in danger of missing the all-important ICC 2019 Cricket World Cup. Jason Roy, a prolific run-scorer for England in last couple of years, suffered a serious injury scare while playing for his county Surrey in a Royal London Cup, the premier domestic 50-over tournament in the country, against Essex.The IncidentRoy opened the innings for his team with Mark Stoneman but had to retire hurt after four overs had been bowled. The reason for his discomfort which led to him calling the physio on the field seemed to be a problem with his hamstring. The right-hander was batting on 16 at that moment.It was reported by some sources that the problem turned out to be back spasms. The authorities soon revealed that the opener is fit enough to come out and bat later in the innings. After the seventh wicket fell for the team at the end of 46th over, Roy did indeed walk out again to resume his knock. The 28-year old batted till the end of 50 overs and with some boundaries helped his side get to a competitive score of 278/8. He ended up unbeaten on 35 off just 23 balls with 4 fours and 1 six. Jason Roy is the opener for Surrey along with Mark StonemanTwitter/Surrey CricketImportance of RoyRoy and Hales are both part of the preliminary 15-member squad announced by England for the ICC 2019 Cricket World Cup. While Hales has flitted in and out of the team, Roy has become a regular member of the side and has formed a very potent opening partnership with Yorkshire’s Jonny Bairstow.England’s ability to post big totals as well as chase them down has been largely due to the strength of their batting order with the Surrey batsman playing a key role. Recently in West Indies, he again showed his batting prowess by scoring a big hundred in his team’s successful chase of a 361-run target set by the home side. He ended up as the top scorer with a score of 123 off just 85 balls in that match. Thanks to his innings, England coasted to a victory with more than an over remaining.With Hales in doubt for the big event, a serious injury to Roy would have severely dented England’s standing as the favourites to win ODI cricket’s premier tournament. However, his return to the crease and scoring of some useful runs towards the end suggests the home side don’t have much to worry about.last_img read more

Sensex likely to take a hit on Monday courtesy Rexit

first_imgThe Sensex is likely to open on a negative note on Monday, courtesy Rexit (Raghuram Rajan’s exit).  Rajan’s decision not to seek a second term after his current tenure as RBI governor ends on September 4 is expected to impact market sentiments. The benchmark index had closed at 26,625 on Friday, up 100 points from its previous close.The personal attacks on him by BJP Rajya Sabha member Subramanian Swamy left little doubt in the minds of many analysts of a possible second term for the Rajan. In a sense, Rexit was almost a foregone conclusion.The development has come a couple of days ahead of another dampener called Brexit and could impact bank stocks since Rajan’s efforts to clean up bank balance sheets was seen as a positive by many bankers and analysts.Rajan himself had listed loan recoveries as an important achievement in his farewell letter addressed to RBI employees.”…creating a whole set of new structures to allow banks to recover payments from failing projects, and forcing timely bank recognition of their unacknowledged bad debts and provisioning under the Asset Quality Review (AQR),” he said in his letter.His likely exit as the central bank chief was seen as a bad signal to foreign investors, with one economist even going to the extent of saying a few weeks ago that the flight of capital could be even $100 billion. The war on non-performing assets, so to speak, could take a beating with his exit, according to a senior journalist. One way of looking at #RaghuramRajan story: War on crony capitalism is over. Full normalcy restored. Capitalism lost, cronies won.— Shekhar Gupta (@ShekharGupta) June 18, 2016It is pertinent here that the amount owed by wilful defaulters to state-run Indian commercial banks more than doubled between December 2012 and December 2015. The amount stood at Rs. 66,190 crore (about $10 billion) as on Dec. 31, 2015, Jayant Sinha, minister of state for finance, informed the Rajya Sabha last month.Some of the bank stocks that would be in focus are State Bank of India, ICICI Bank, PNB, Bank of Baroda and a slew of mid-cap private and public sector banks.The sense of stability he lent to the economy would be remembered, according to Biocon CMD Kiran Mazumdar Shaw.RBI Gov Raghuram Rajan Not Seeking Second Term – Academic gain. RBI loss He leaves a legacy of economic stability https://t.co/K1eXosOosg— Kiran Mazumdar Shaw (@kiranshaw) June 18, 2016Another veteran industrialist, Harsh Goenka, said his exit is India’s loss.Globally acknowledged. Inflation warrior. Economic guru. Independent mind. Bank surgeon. #RaghuramRajan leaving is a loss to the nation.— Harsh Goenka (@hvgoenka) June 18, 2016last_img read more

Tannery shift lessens 40 pc pollution of Buriganga Anisul

first_imgAnisul Islam MahmudWater resources minister Anisul Islam Mahmud said the shifting of tannery from the city’s Hazaribagh area has reduced about 40 per cent pollution of Buriganga River.The minister came up with the claim at a road march programme starting from Bahadur Shah Park to Sadarghat on Saturday to mark the World Rivers Day which is set to be observed on Sunday.He said, “Now, we have to stop the rest of the 60 per cent of pollution of the river.”Dhaka Water Supply & Sewerage Authority (DWASA) has been asked to prevent pollution and removal of wastes from the river, the minister said, adding that they have already prepared a work plan in this regard.”We have to take such measures so that industrial and household wastes will not drain out to the river.”A good number of participants joined the programme.The theme of this year’s World Rivers Day is “Encroachment-pollution free rivers: Save Life and Nature”.Speakers at the programme vowed to protect the rivers and build awareness among the people against pollution and encroachment.World Rivers Day Coordination Council (WRDCC) read out five proposals and five promises at the programme. Since 2010, Bangladesh has observing the World Rivers Day. The day is observed on the last Sunday of September every year.last_img read more

Who is Las Vegas gunman

first_imgThis undated and unlocated low resolution image widely circulating on social networks and US media identifies Stephen Paddock, the gunman who killed 58 people and injured over 500 during an open air concert on October 01, 2017 in Las Vegas. AFPStephen Craig Paddock, the retired accountant who smuggled an arsenal into a swank Las Vegas hotel and mowed down concert-goers from a 32nd story window, was a high-stakes gambler whose bank-robber father was once on the FBI’s most wanted list.The 64-year-old had a home with his girlfriend in a tranquil golf course retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada, 80 miles (130 kilometers) northeast of the US gambling capital, and regularly sent cookies to his 90-year-old mother in Florida.According to his younger brother Eric Paddock, he showed no sign he was poised to commit one of the worst mass murders in American history.The Islamic State group claimed Paddock was one of its “soldiers,” converting to Islam in recent months and carrying out the attack in its name. Islamic State gave him a jihadist nom de guerre, Abu Abdel Bar al-Amriki-“The American.”But the FBI said they saw “no connection” between Paddock and international terror groups, leaving a stunned nation at a loss to understand the motive for the Sunday night massacre, which left 59 people dead and more than 500 injured.Paddock was found dead, apparently of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, when a police SWAT team burst into his room in the Mandalay Bay Hotel, one of Las Vegas’s most recognizable landmarks.“He had nothing to do with any political organization, religious organization, no white supremacists, nothing, as far as I know. And I’ve only known him for 57 years,” Eric Paddock said outside his Orlando, Florida home.“We’re still just completely befuddled, dumbstruck,” he added. “It’s like I just said, an asteroid fell out of the sky.”High-stakes video-poker playerThe gunman, who photographs showed as a greying man with a trimmed beard and moustache, was a former accountant and a licensed private pilot.According to Eric Paddock, his brother was financially well-off, and had no criminal record. “He doesn’t even have parking tickets, probably” he said.He owned two houses in Nevada, one a two-story home in a desert-surrounded cul-de-sac in Mesquite, another on the fringes of Reno, another gambling hub in the northern part of the state. Estimates by Zillow put the value of the homes, both very recently built, at over $700,000.At both he was seen with a regular companion identified as Marilou Danley, an 62-year-old Asian woman who was out of the country at the time of the shooting. The FBI has tracked her down and said she is cooperating with them.Neighbors in Mesquite and Reno called him quiet, sometimes grumpy, but mostly keeping to himself, according to The Washington Post.He was also a regular gambler. He mostly playing high-stakes video poker, often thousands of dollars at a time.“He sends me a text that says he won $250,000 at the casino,” Eric Paddock said.But what police found in his Mandalay Bay Hotel room after the horrifying massacre was not money but at least 16 weapons, including assault rifles. And they later found more weapons and explosives in the Mesquite home.“Where the hell did he get automatic weapons? He has no military background or anything like that,” his brother asked. Stephen was “not an avid gun guy at all.”Bank-robber fatherThe brothers grew up in a broken home. Their father, Benjamin Hoskins Paddock, who also went by the name Patrick, was a violent bank robber jailed in the early 1960s for a series of heists.He escaped prison in 1968, landing on the FBI’s “10 most wanted” list, which described him as “extremely dangerous” and “psychopathic.”Eric Paddock said they barely knew their father. “I was born on the run,” he told the Post.But he stressed that his brother gave no signs other than being completely normal, doting on their mother.“He liked to play video poker. He went on cruises. He sent his mother cookies, big huge crazy boxes of cookies,” Eric said. Stephen most recently texted to see if his mother had power after a hurricane lashed Florida.“The last time she talked to him, no indication of anything.”“We’re trying to understand what happened,” his brother said. “We’re lost.”Read MoreLas Vegas shooting death toll rises to 50last_img read more

Those defeated have nothing to do says Quader

first_imgRoad, transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader. File PhotoRoad, transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader on Wednesday said nobody believes that those who faced defeat both in their movement and in election have anything new to do, reports UNB.The minister made the remarks while talking to newsmen before starting his journey for Tungipara from Shimuliaghat in Munshiganj in the morning.”They failed to wage any movement for 10 minutes in the last 10 years. What will they do now? If they wage any movement politically, we’ll face it politically,” he said.Responding to a question about Oikya Front’s programme demanding cancellation of the election, Quader said it is the opposition party’s programme, it is their personal matter.”They can announce any programme in a legal way cantering the election. There’s nothing to say. Action will be taken, if they carry out violence in the name of movement.”Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, accompanied by her cabinet colleagues and senior Awami League leaders, went to Tungipara today and paid homage to Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman marking the installation of her government for the third consecutive term.last_img read more