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How to Succeed in Business: Meditate

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFrom Fortune Magazine last month, a feature article takes a look at the CEOs who are into meditation, like NBA coach Phil Jackson and Bob Shapiro, the former CEO of Monsanto. Employees at Google have even organized “twice-weekly open meditation hours, at which it has hosted Tibetan monks and a team of mind-science researchers.” (CNN Money)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Baby We Were Born to Run

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Bruce Springsteen celebrated his 60th birthday on Friday, and landed on the cover of AARP’s magazine. “We put Bruce on the cover first and foremost because he was turning 60,” she said. “Like the rest of America, we found that to be inspiring. Looking at Bruce, he really personifies our message at AARP that attitude matters more than age.” (Continue reading in NYTImes Health blog) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Electric Car Plant to be Built in Hawaii

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSouth Korean electric car manufacturer CT&T announced plans to build an assembly plant in Hawaii that will eventually produce up to 10,000 vehicles a year and employ as many as 400 people.The CT&T plant would make small urban two-seaters that reach speeds up to 40 mph with their batteries lasting 30 or 60 miles, depending on the model. Recharging will be easy at electric stations that are planned to begin popping up by the end of this year. (Read the AP story at Mother Nature News)Hawaii is the ideal place for electric cars to flourish due to the high cost of imported gasoline.In other electric car news, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and top executives of the country’s main carmakers and energy companies met in Berlin last week to launch a new initiative to develop electric vehicles. Merkel pledged to have one million electric vehicles on the road within the next decade, reports the AP. (Read that story at the Seattle Times)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Across Israel, Arabs and Jews Live Together in Peace

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis video was created in order to show a side of Israel that the media doesn’t show. All across Israel, both Arabs and Jews are living together peacefully in the hopes that someday the conflict will be resolved. So next time you hear about Israel in the news, think about the side of Israel that they are choosing not to show you.last_img read more

Homecoming Queen Kicks Winning Field Goal (w/ Video)

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreLast Friday, Brianna Amat, the first girl to make the varsity football team at her high school in Michigan, was called onto the field during halftime — while she was still in her uniform — and crowned Homecoming Queen. Less than an hour later, she made a 31-yard field goal, helping her team win the game 9-7.“They’ve been so accepting of me, it’s as if I’ve always been their teammate,” she explained.(WATCH the Fox video below, and READ the story in the NY Times)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Teen Produces “Miss Amazing” Pageants for Girls With Disabilities

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreJordan Somer has been a believer in beauty pageants since she was 7 years old, when they began teaching her how to be confident and work toward any goal. But when she had the opportunity to be around people with special needs at the Special Olympics, when she saw success everywhere, “on the track, the field, and each level of the award platforms,” Somer knew what she was meant to do.In November of 2007, she held the first annual Miss Amazing pageant. Every contestant became a winner and they each get a crown. “What began as my way to share my experiences with girls with disabilities in Nebraska, has become my passion and future career.”The mission is now spreading nationwide with at least 22 state pageants being planned for next year.At the first-ever national pageant recently in Omaha, Nebraska, contestants with disabilities gathered from around the country to perform, compete and touch people’s hearts.(WATCH the video below, or READ the story at TODAY)LEARN more at their website, missamazingpageant.com;AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Birds Bring Gifts to Little Girl Who Feeds Them

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA little girl from Seattle has developed a routine of feeding the local birds. In return, she has been rewarded with shiny trinkets and gifts delivered by their own beaks.Gabi Mann’s relationship with the neighborhood crows began accidentally when she was four and regularly dropped food on the ground. But later, when she began feeding them daily, gifts started appearing.The BBC reports, “The crows would clear the feeder of peanuts, and leave shiny trinkets on the empty tray; an earring, a hinge, a polished rock – anything shiny and small enough to fit in a crow’s mouth. ““When you see Gabi’s collection, it’s hard not to wish for gift-giving crows of your own.”(READ the story from the BBC)Story tips from Joel Arellano and Dianne CunninghamAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Brazil Rights a Wrong, Devotes Military Plane to Organ Transplants

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore That decision comes after one of the biggest Brazilian media outlets, O Globo, reported that between 2013 and 2015 the Air Force authority declined to transport 153 organs, and rather prioritized the transportation of government officials instead.After hearing the report and talking to his assigned staff, the president decided to equip an airplane exclusively for the transportation of patients or their life-saving cargo.MORE: Good News from the U.S. Air Force(WATCH the video above from Joao Freitas, reporting from Brazil for Good News Network)(Photo by Chris Lofting, CC) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore After public outcry following a media investigation, the interim President of Brazil, Michel Temer, announced that the Brazilian Armed Forces will provide a plane exclusively for transporting organs for transplant patients.CHECK OUT: College Freshman “Prank” Collects Over 2 Tons of Food in Brazillast_img read more

Watch Guys Give Out $100 Tips to Fast Food Workers

first_imgClick To Share This Sweet Video With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Kyle Oreffice and Jesse Hill of Give Back Films gave five different fast food restaurant workers $100 bills on Saturday as a way of spreading Christmas cheer.RELATED: Firefighters Pay it Forward Big Time After Waitress With Heart of Gold Picks Up TabThe stunt is not out of the ordinary for the duo’s channel – Kyle and Jesse’s other films feature such gestures as making 100 sandwiches for the homeless, surprising street performers with massive amounts of money, and paying for other people’s drive-thru meals.(WATCH the video below) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreNothing says the holidays like random acts of kindness – that’s why these two YouTubers decided to surprise random drive-thru workers with a hefty tip.last_img read more

CVS is Now Offering Allergy Medication at 1/6th the Cost of the EpiPen

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOver 9,000 different CVS branches nationwide are now carrying generic versions of the Adrenaclick auto-injector, an allergy medication similar to the EpiPen currently marketed by Mylan, but at 1/6th of the cost.Mylan has been criticized for hiking the price of the life-saving drug by 500% since 2007. Though Adrenaclick is not the same as Mylan’s EpiPen, patients may be able to access the generic dual pack at CVS for $109.99 – as opposed to the outrageous price of $600 – with permission and consultation from their doctors. Over the past year, nearly 150,000 people signed on to a petition asking for a lower cost epinephrine auto-injector option and millions more were active on social media searching for a solution.RELATED: Bold Trials to Kill Vicious Cancer Type is So Successful, FDA Will Fast Track to Patients“As a health care company focused on helping people on their path to better health, we recognized that there was an urgent need in the marketplace for a less expensive epinephrine auto-injector for patients with life-threatening allergies,” said Helena Foulkes, President of CVS Pharmacy in a statement.POPULAR: Grateful For American Dream, Immigrant CEO Shares Millions With Workers at Chobani“In order to address this challenge, we have partnered with Impax Laboratories to purchase their epinephrine auto-injector at a price that is lower than similar brand or authorized generic epinephrine auto-injectors. We are passing these savings along to our customers and patients, making this product available at all CVS Pharmacy locations at the lowest cash price in the market.”Multiply The Good: Click To Share (Photo by Greg Friese, CC)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

More and More Farmers Are Using Garlicky Supplements to Curb Major Environmental Enemy: Cow Gas

first_imgUnlike CO2, which represents more than 80% of America’s GHGs, methane only stays in the atmosphere for 12 years, which means the supplements would take only a few years to begin having a measurable effect.RELATED: Air Pollution in Major World Cities Has Dropped By as Much as 60% During COVID Shutdowns, Says New ReportMootral, the Switzerland-based company, will likely be celebrating their supplement’s success as they are set to be the first company on earth to be awarded carbon credits for methane reduction in cows. Both studies of the supplement have shown no adverse effects, both in the health of the animal and the flavor of the milk and meat.The start-up came as a result of examining garlic’s antimicrobial effect on the human diet, and discovered they benefit cows. Cows produce methane when food in their chambered stomachs is broken down by microbes. The garlic supplement mixed with citrus “pellets” reduces the amount of microbes present, thereby making the belching less potent.Chipping AwayAccording to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) executive summary of America’s GHG inventory from 1990 to 2016, agriculture as a whole accounted for 10% of America’s emissions, with 2.52% coming from enteric fermentation—the fermentation of feed in the stomachs of cows.If every cow in America (a little over 100 million animals) and all 30 million horses for that matter, were in theory given the Mootral supplement and it corresponded with the previously-observed decrease of 30% in the animal’s methane emissions, merely 1.66% of GHGs in America could be attributed to animal agriculture. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhile passing gas is usually considered a simple social passé for humans, cow burps are notorious for producing much more than a foul smell—they produce a gas that is terrible for the environment.Thankfully, a new garlic-based dietary supplement given to cows has been shown in two different studies to reduce the methane content in cow belches by 30%–38%, which could help reduce the 2.6% of American greenhouse gas volume produced from cattle ranching.Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that traps heat in the atmosphere 25 times more effectively than CO2, according to the EPA and the IPCC. CHECK OUT: Kroger Buys and Redirects Dairy Farmers’ Excess Milk, Sending 50,000 Gallons Per Month to Food BanksSuch a drop would see enteric fermentation fall from the largest source of methane emissions in the US to around the levels produced by landfills.Mootral CEO Thomas Hafner has a realistic view of how reducing these small amounts of methane from cows and other livestock through cultural changes will be almost impossible.“…even though we see a move towards non-dairy alternatives, and people going to non-animal protein sources, populations in other parts of the world are progressing from a cereal-based diet into an animal protein-rich diet. Whatever we lose on one side, we’re going to gain on the other, if not more. What we provide is a solution to reduce the impact of that down the line.”Multiply The Good News By Sharing It With Your Friends On Social Media — Representative feature photo by Dave_A, CCAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Purdue win lacks intensity

first_imgMany Notre Dame students followed the football team south to West Lafayette on Saturday to watch the Irish defeat the Purdue Boilermakers 31-24. Despite the win, students said they were bothered by the “intrusive” Jumbotron in the Boilermaker’s stadium. Caitlin Crommett, a junior entrepreneurship and film, theatre, and television double major, said she headed to Purdue on Friday to visit friends at Purdue and then enjoy game day.  “I felt [game day] was a pretty enjoyable experience in the stadium,” she said. “We didn’t have any negative reactions to us being in the stadium.  We weren’t heckled.  Before we went inside, we joined a Purdue tailgating party.” Crommett said she prefers the Notre Dame game day experience to the Purdue atmosphere. She said Purdue misused of the jumbotron, which she felt created a divide in the crowd. “It detracted people from what was going on the field,” Crommett said.  “I like how at Notre Dame people at our games are focused on what’s on the field, and people aren’t turned around watching a screen while the other half watch what’s in front of them.” Senior Blake Weaver said he has traveled to away games throughout his four years at Notre Dame as a member of the Band of the Fighting Irish. He said watching the game at Purdue made him appreciate Notre Dame’s lack of a Jumbotron. “The consistent interviews and corny trivia [on the Jumbotron] throughout the game were distractions and missed opportunities for the band to get to play since we had to listen to the announcer talk about advertisements or random Purdue facts,” he said. Weaver, who traveled to Michigan last week with the band, said Purdue’s Jumbotron is not what makes the game day experience less enjoyable than Notre Dame home games, but rather that Purdue “utilized their Jumbotron incorrectly.” “During the downtime for the game, they should incorporate more of their cheerleaders and band instead of watching commercials and throwing footballs through a giant blowup donut on the field.  I felt like I was at a baseball game with those fan participatory games,” he said. The Notre Dame versus Michigan game last weekend exhibited a more intense rivalry, Weaver said. The atmosphere is so much more intense [in Ann Arbor],” he said. “It’s more of a true football game where both teams are accomplished and revered programs.” Sophomore Daniel Strickland attended both the Michigan and Purdue games.  He said he also thought Purdue’s game-day atmosphere was comparatively more calm than Michigan’s.   “They don’t have the same intensity as Notre Dame or Michigan would have. We sat most of the time except for the big plays. It was more comfortable, but it was a testament to the lack of intensity,” Strickland said. Strickland also said the Jumbotron negatively impacted his game-day experience. “During the game, I liked being able to see the Jumbotron and the game, but when the game wasn’t going, the Jumbotron could’ve been used in better ways to pump up the crowd,” he said. Strickland said he preferred the way the Jumbotron was used at Michigan, which got fans way more into the game than at Purdue.   “[Purdue] needs to show more highlights and clips to pump up the crowd,” he said. Strickland said Purdue’s mismanaged Jumbotron showed him the benefit of Notre Dame’s Jumbotron-less stadium. “If Notre Dame used a Jumbotron like Purdue did, then I’m fine with Notre Dame not having one,” he said. Sophomore Michael Brown visited Purdue to meet up with a friend attending college there.  “She showed me their fanfare around campus, like the clapping circle. I also got a photo with the Neil Armstrong statue on campus,” Brown said. Brown said he noticed a mix of spirited and hopeless Purdue fans. “At 4 p.m. when we were walking around campus, we heard from five different Purdue fans that Notre Dame was going to kill them.  Around 7:30 when we walked to the stadium, we only heard “Notre Dame, go home, we’re going to kill you!  I thought it was funny being in an enemy’s territory,” he said. Brown said Purdue used the Jumbotron in a cheesy way. “The intro of the team to the field was cool. But mostly, they did cheesy things that kept interest,” he said. “Asking about Bruce Willis movies and comparing them to the team were useless. They did a lot of stuff with the Jumbotron that I expect bad teams to do. Trust me, I’m a Pirates fan.” Brown said in comparison with the Notre Dame game-day experience, students at Purdue were less enthralled with the game. “It seemed like there were a bunch of people who didn’t care,” he said. “Some students obviously cared, but a decent proportion just didn’t go and didn’t care. They have a good team and there should be more people on campus who back them. I don’t see that here at Notre Dame. We’re extremely unified.”last_img read more

Alumni bring Philly Pretzel Factory to South Bend

first_imgThe first time 1996 Notre Dame graduate Mark Naman tasted a real Philadelphia pretzel, he was living in New Jersey with his wife, Maryse, a member of the Saint Mary’s class of 1996. It was, in a word, “phantastic.” That’s the experience they’re aiming to bring to the South Bend community with the Philly Pretzel Factory, Mark Naman said.“You get the pretzel hot out of the oven, and it’s a different experience,” he said. “It’s the first time people have access to a pretzel right out of the oven. … It’s really phenomenal.”This June, the Namans opened the first Indiana location of the Philly Pretzel Factory on South Bend Avenue, across from The Linebacker. They view this exciting opportunity as a chance to share a product that they are passionate about with the South Bend community.To celebrate the recent opening, the Namans are holding a grand opening celebration, which includes a ribbon cutting ceremony and a raffle for two Notre Dame football tickets Friday, as well as free pretzel giveaways for all customers Friday and Saturday, Mark Naman said.“It’s a great opportunity to come try the product,” he said. “We mix the dough fresh every morning, put it in this machine that strings it out for us and then we twist them ourselves.”Students who hail from the east coast might recognize the Philly Pretzel Factory, Tom Monaghan, chief development officer of Philly Pretzel Factory, said. He said he hopes the pretzels can bring a little taste of home to students while remaining well within their budgets.“It’s bringing a little bit of comfort food from home that many are familiar with — not only pretzels, but also Philly cheesesteaks,” Monaghan said.Maryse Naman agreed and said she wishes a store of this kind was open when she was attending Saint Mary’s.The low prices of the hand-made and hand-twisted pretzels — which can be paid for using Domer Dollars — make them a perfect snack for a college student on the go, Mark Naman said. An employee on a lunch break or a student on his or her way to class, he said, can be in and out of the store with a freshly-made lunch in five minutes.Beside the classic pretzels — which are made fresh daily with high-protein malted-barley flour — the franchise offers specialty items such as cinnamon pretzel twists, mini pretzels, pretzel dogs, cheesesteak pretzels and a variety of mustards, most of which are available in party trays. They recently launched a new party tray of “mini dogs” — pigs in a blanket — which the Namans hope will be a big hit during tailgate season.During football season, the store plans to open early on home game days and close well after the games end.“We also felt that we might get some of the student body involved — whether it’s working here or in terms of fundraising,” Maryse Naman said.The fundraising program will give clubs, teams or dorms the chance to buy a large quantity of pretzels at an extremely low cost for resale, Mark Naman said. Additionally, the store will provide the first 100 pretzels free of charge.“We are going to look to start engaging with clubs and student activities,” Mark Naman said.  “I remember from my time at Notre Dame, I was in a few different clubs and we were all trying to find ways to raise money.”To the Namans, Philly Pretzel Factory serves as more than just a food service. They plan to be engaged in the community through charitable organizations, local businesses, schools and universities, Mark Naman said.“What we liked about the business — and why we decided to stay here after leaving Notre Dame — was that we like the community,” he said. “The student community and the local community makes it a fantastic place just to live, and we want to stay engaged with that. … We won’t just be staying in [the store], we’ll get to go out and be a part of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s and the local Michiana community — the churches, the businesses and the schools.”Monaghan and the Namans are all looking forward to giving South Bend the real Philly pretzel experience, Monaghan said.“We couldn’t be more proud to have a franchise with an ND alum,” he said.Tags: Alumni, Philly Pretzel Factory, South Bend communitylast_img read more

Stanford rector reflects on time with residents

first_imgWith a diverse repertoire of previous addresses including locations such as Texas and Iraq, Justin McDevitt now calls Stanford Hall home.McDevitt, the current rector of Stanford Hall, is starting his second year in the dorm. Hailing from Conroe, Texas, McDevitt went to college at the University of Houston and law school at the University of Loyola Chicago. He came to Notre Dame to pursue a Ph.D in political science, when he suddenly discovered a different passion, he said.“I had been TA-ing and I co-taught a course, and I was about to enter into the period when I needed to stop teaching and just hide in the library for a year and a half for my dissertation,” McDevitt said. “I decided that that wasn’t my passion. My passion was to work with students.”McDevitt said he came to this realization with the help of Fr. Sean McGraw, political science professor and the co-founder of the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE). McGraw brought up the possibility of McDevitt becoming a rector, which at the time McDevitt knew nothing about. However, once he heard the description, he said, he was sold.“The first year was great,” McDevitt said. “I’m kind of spoiled — we had an incredible rector before, and so the hall was in great shape. He was just a very well-respected guy.”McDevitt said his first year was a great year for Stanford. The hall claimed two titles: interhall football champions and Hall of the Year.“When we won Hall of the Year there were 150 guys in the back waiting for us,” he said. “It was really a triumphant, really special moment.”Before becoming a rector, McDevitt completed years of higher education and worked as a cost analyst for a government contractor at their headquarters in Baghdad. However, he said, he feels like he has finally found the perfect job fit.“My first day as rector, a first-year from the Middle East asked me to help him do his laundry, and I realized that I went from teaching political parties to teaching kids how to do laundry — and I was fine with that,” he said. “I am teaching. I’m teaching life instead of political science.”McDevitt is excited to bring the role of a rector to the forefront, he said, and show that it is a crucial role where someone is dedicating their lives to students. McDevitt said he believes he likes this aspect so much because of the people that have surrounded him during his life.“I’ve had so many great people in my life, and if I look back on my own experiences the parts where I learned the most were kind of everyday life experiences,” he said. “I learned a lot of important things in the classroom, but really so much of life happens outside the classroom. For a lot of these guys the rector is the teacher for the rest of the time. Rather than having students for three hours a week, I have them for everything but three hours a week.”McDevitt said after years of study and work he finally feels like he is at a point where he is confident and passionate about what he is doing.“I feel like after 24 years of higher education, I’ve been to at least two countries on every continent, this is where I’m home,” he said.Tags: Hall of the year, Justin McDevitt, Stanford Halllast_img read more

OIT makes updates to campus technology

first_imgIn a world that seems to be making technological progress every day, Notre Dame’s Office of Information Technologies (OIT) works to fulfill its stated mission of providing “effective information technology solutions to advance the University’s mission and goals.” OIT made several updates to its technological services offerings for the 2015-2016 school year, affecting University printers, websites and the ND mobile app.Katie Rose, OIT senior director of user services, said the new printers across campus and the new computers in classrooms and labs are the most noticeable updates the office made over the summer.ERIN RICE | The Observer Rose said OIT ordered new Canon printers for the campus residence halls and computer labs to replace the old Xerox ones, after the University’s contract with Xerox expired.“The procurement office actually did a request for bids to look for the best deal that the University could get for printing,” Rose said. “And in that process, Canon won out. So that was the primary driver for switching all of the printers out.”Rose said the Canon printers also provide additional technological services to students.“We should see better, faster printing with these newer devices,” she said. “Now you can use your ID card to swipe to sign in, instead of having to log in on a release station. And, in addition to that, the printers are all now multifunction devices (MFDs), so you can copy and scan to e-mail as well.”Rose said although students’ print quotas are now shown in monetary form instead of the old point system, nothing about the University’s print quota system has changed.“You get the same number of pages that you had before,” she said. “The switch back to using dollars instead of points is because of how the Canon system actually works.”Rose said OIT also improved some of its existing services over the summer, including the Notre Dame mobile application, Sakai and campus wireless internet coverage.OIT added new modules to the ND mobile app over the summer that allows students to print, request rides from O’SNAP and view the campus schedule, according to mobileND’s website.“We’ve added some modules and some adjustments to the Notre Dame mobile app, that will allow [students] to access the modules that students care about a little bit faster,” Rose said. “That way, you don’t have to dig quite so deep into the app. They’re continuing to work on the mobile app and add more modules and more functionality.”Rose also said OIT made adjustments to Sakai that will allow students to more easily submit group assignments and provide peer reviews in their classes. OIT plans to continue to make improvements to Sakai and other Notre Dame interactive websites over the course of the school year, she said.“We want to build integrations with Sakai into other applications like Google Apps and e-Portfolio so that you guys have a centralized system to manage your academic work,” Rose said. “We’re also looking at replacements for the InsideND portal so that we can update that and make it a little more mobile friendly.”Rose said OIT also hopes to make adjustments to the password policy during the fall semester so students could create more secure and easier to remember passwords that would no longer have to be changed every 180 days.Additionally, OIT is extending its help desk hours, Rose said, to give students more opportunities to get technological support when they need it.“We’re continuing to build and train the team that’s working there so that you can get even better technical support,” she said. “We’re going to be launching a knowledge base on the web as well that allows you to search for answers to IT questions and find what you need without having to talk to somebody.”Rose said overall, the OIT staff finds their role at the University to be extremely rewarding.“I work at a place where the focus of what I do isn’t on a bottom line, it’s on delivering services that enable the University to educate amazing people who go out and do awesome things in this world,” she said. “We can roll out a billion technology services, but if we can’t help everybody make the best use of them and make sure those tools meet everyone’s needs, then we’re not doing our job for the University.”Tags: OIT, printer quotalast_img read more

Sprinkler goes off in Keough Hall

first_imgA fire sprinkler in Keough Hall deployed without the help of a fire Tuesday afternoon, flooding one room.A Notre Dame Fire Department officer at the scene said the sprinkler went off in a dorm room. University spokesman Dennis Brown said Building Services, the Risk Management and Safety Office and the Notre Dame Fire Department worked to preserve property on the second floor and “to some extent” on the first floor.Brown said the Risk Management and Safety Office will replace damaged items, “with hall staff providing support and assisting with immediate needs.”last_img read more