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What goes into the decision to discharge a president with Covid-19?

first_img If you value our coronavirus coverage, please consider making a one-time contribution to support our journalism. Does it matter where they are going when they are discharged — and when in the course of their infection?Where patients are going is critical, whether it’s home or to a rehab facility. They need people to care for them and to keep a watchful eye over them so they can raise a red flag if something isn’t going right.In the first week, people have what’s called the viral portion of the disease. A small proportion of people will get sicker in the second week — and those cases present more like an inflammatory syndrome, Boucher said. “We worry about that second phase. That happens around day 7 through 10. We’ll be monitoring anybody like that.”Thomas File, president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, said at the hospital where he practices, Summa Health in Akron, Ohio, only half of Covid-19 patients go home after five or six days, which is the median length of stay when ICU patients are excluded. Others go to extended care facilities to be monitored and cared for with more medical attention than at home. Trump looks on from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Sunday. ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images About the Authors Reprints The 8 most important leaders of Operation Warp Speed What do you do when people want to leave against medical advice?During a public health emergency with a communicable infectious disease, it is appropriate in some cases to prevent people from leaving against medical advice if they don’t have a safe place to go, Boucher said. During Boston’s spring surge in Covid-19 cases, hospitals sent patients to a nearby empty convention center to keep them in isolation after discharge, whether their leaving was with or without their doctors’ blessing. The discharge plan for any Covid patient has to involve making sure the patient has a very clear understanding that the individual will be isolated for the duration, Boucher said.“In the vast majority of those cases, we would do everything we could to ensure a safe discharge,” she said. That might include things like having a visiting nurse come to the home, oxygen in the home, and physical therapy. “I’d also try to talk them into staying.” WASHINGTON — President Trump is set to leave Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Monday evening. But it’s unclear if Trump’s doctors were discharging their patient purely on medical grounds — or whether the president, anxious about the optics of a lengthy hospital stay and eager to resume his reelection campaign, simply demanded he be allowed to leave.In a brief press conference Monday afternoon, Sean Conley said Trump was displaying few of the symptoms he’d experienced over the weekend, and that he generally met the medical criteria that would justify a hospital discharge.Those medical criteria can vary — depending on the patient, on the progression of their disease, and the place they’re getting discharged to, infectious disease experts told STAT.advertisement Please enter a valid email address. Trending Now: Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” @NicholasFlorko PoliticsWhat goes into the decision to discharge a president with Covid-19? [email protected] Related: Related: The lesson from Trump catching Covid-19: With this virus, there are no magic bullets [email protected] There are other, larger medical clinics on the White House campus, too. The White House also does not currently have anything resembling the trappings of the intensive care units used to care for the sickest of Covid-19 patients.The largest clinic, according to photos, resembles an average internist’s office — though, uniquely, it has the White House seal emblazoned on certain walls. There are multiple exam rooms, which are outfitted with the standard vinyl leather exam chair. A 2009 photo shows an eye chart and a run-of-the-mill computer for accessing medical records.“Literally when you walk in, it’s like a doctor’s office in that there’s a receptionist there,” said Caldera.That clinic is located in an office building next door, and it’s normally available to anyone on the grounds. One White House physician, in her memoir, describes treating everyone from a tourist who fainted after not eating breakfast to an Army official who suffered a fatal brain hemorrhage. The office has been in the spotlight, too, for overzealously treating overworked White House staffers: Several news outlets reported in 2018 that the office would routinely hand out prescription drugs, like the sleeping pill Ambien, to White House staffers. Support STAT: Nicholas Florko Elizabeth Cooney Related: Are people using oxygen at home?Trump has already been given supplemental oxygen at the White House, when he experienced a drop in his oxygen levels Friday before being flown to Walter Reed.Generally speaking, it is not unreasonable to think that some people might require oxygen at home, perhaps when they slept at night for some period, Boucher said. In general, things are getting better and they would be requiring less oxygen if not no oxygen right before they left.File of the Infectious Diseases Society said when patients arrive, supplemental oxygen is their biggest requirement. But they can be discharged when that need lessens, usually to another setting where they can be monitored. “We would like for them to be able to go home without oxygen supplementation,” he said.Shortness of breath doesn’t have to be all the way resolved, Bell said, but it should have significantly improved. Are there public health risks to discharging a Covid-19 patient too early?Federal guidelines require people who have been symptomatic with Covid-19 to isolate themselves for 10 days after they start showing symptoms. Bell, the UVA doctor, worries about the people around the president, calculating that if he was symptomatic on Wednesday, he should isolate until Oct. 10.“What really concerns me is, how is he going to behave once he gets back to the White House? He’s actually got to isolate and make sure that people are safe, especially if he’s in this infectious period still. Is he going to eschew a lot of these public health guidelines that they’ve shown a willingness to violate so many times consistently already, including yesterday?”He was referring to Trump’s decision to take his motorcade out for a drive in Maryland, a decision that meant several Secret Service officers rode with him, in close proximity. The experts were quick to note, however, that there is far too little public information for them to say whether the decision to discharge Trump is in keeping with normal medical practice. Conley, the White House physician, for example, declined to provide specifics regarding how high Trump’s fever reached, how low his oxygen levels dropped, or what his lung scans looked like. He also declined to provide the date of Trump’s most recent negative Covid-19 test.There is also relatively little known about the kind of care Trump can receive at home at the White House. There is a small medical unit on the campus, including an exam room and office located close to the president’s personal residence. But its capabilities fall substantially short of the specialized care and state-of-the-art technology available at Walter Reed.advertisement A one-page memo could defuse the panic about Trump’s Covid-19. Where is it? Doctors look for progress before allowing any hospitalized patient to leave the hospital.“The kinds of criteria that we use in deciding to discharge someone would include things like their ability to eat and drink, to walk around without needing oxygen, and how their lab tests look,” said Helen Boucher, chief of geographic medicine and infectious diseases at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, who declined to discuss Trump’s case.That doesn’t mean perfect scores on blood counts or measures of inflammatory biomarkers. Doctors want to see any abnormalities that were present trending in the right direction, she said. “People don’t have to be all better. They have to be on the road to being better.” Related: Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson The infectious disease experts also noted that there are major risks for discharging any Covid-19 patient, anywhere, too early. While Trump may be nearing full health, it is also possible he could soon take a turn for the worse, as can happen for Covid-19 patients roughly a week after they start showing symptoms.The treatments Trump has been getting suggest he may have a more severe case of Covid-19 than his doctors have indicated, said Taison Bell, a critical care and infectious disease physician at the University of Virginia. “The medical team is going to be monitoring him very closely the next few days and keep checking vital signs.”Below, STAT lays out what we know — and what we can’t know — about Trump’s discharge. Trump is receiving dexamethasone, a steroid usually given to patients with severe Covid-19 General Assignment Reporter Liz focuses on cancer, biomedical engineering, and how patients feel the effects of Covid-19. Privacy Policy Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. What kind of treatment is available at the White House?Trump isn’t going to be discharged into your standard suburban home. The White House residence itself has a small doctor’s office, and there’s also a sizable clinic next door. One official said that the entire enterprise, known as the White House Medical Unit, operates akin to an “urgent care clinic,” which can rapidly be scaled up into something resembling a top-tier hospital.“Releasing him to the White House permits a much higher level of medical attention and intervention than any other person in the nation would ever receive. It’s not like releasing you or me to go home,” said Louis Caldera, who from January 2009 to May 2009 directed the White House Military Office, which includes the medic’s office.Trump’s doctor said Monday, ahead of his discharge, that there was no care being provided to the president at Walter Reed that couldn’t be done at the White House’s medical unit, as of now.Most likely, Trump would be seen in the White House physician’s personal office and exam room, which are on the ground floor of the White House, just steps from the president’s personal residence. The tiny office is tucked next to the ornate Map Room. It is connected by elevator to the residence, two floors above. [email protected] By Elizabeth Cooney , Nicholas Florko , and Lev Facher Oct. 5, 2020 Reprints Do most people with Covid-19 leave the hospital while they still have symptoms?Trump’s medical team said during Monday’s press conference that the president’s vital signs were normal and that he was walking around and feeling better. Bell, the UVA doctor, said he was encouraged that the team was releasing more information on the president’s clinical status. At UVA Hospital where he works, if patients are still in a period where they can be shedding the coronavirus and potentially infecting others, they are discharged with specific instructions on how to isolate to keep themselves and others safe.In 2020 in America, most people leave the hospital still having symptoms, Boucher said. “We hope they’re better. So the criteria, say, for us to allow folks out of isolation after 10 days having Covid, they don’t say all your symptoms have to be gone. You have to be better. We make sure that someone has a spouse, a child, a sister or somebody, you know, it goes right with them or who can look after them.” Related: @cooney_liz Lev Facher Trump to be discharged from Walter Reed, doctor says, but ‘might not be entirely out of the woods’ Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. @levfacher Leave this field empty if you’re human: How do doctors decide when a Covid-19 patient can leave the hospital?Patients who have been sick enough to need hospitalization — about 20% of people who have Covid-19 symptoms — usually end up in a hospital bed because they experienced shortness of breath or had a fever so high it left them dehydrated and losing weight. Trump reportedly suffered a low-grade fever Friday, and Conley said he experienced minor dehydration upon arriving at Walter Reed. While his oxygen levels dropped, Conley said, Trump did not experience shortness of breath. Tags CoronavirusDonald Trumppublic healthlast_img read more

OSC introduces Investor Office

first_img OSC finalizes DSC ban Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Retail trading surge on regulators’ radar, Vingoe says NASAA approves model act for establishing restitution funds Facebook LinkedIn Twitter “Investor protection is at the core of everything we do,” says Howard Wetston, CEO and chairman of the OSC, in a statement. “The OSC is strongly committed to delivering on its mandate to protect investors. The creation of the Investor Office is but one way we are fulfilling the commitments we made in our statement of priorities to put the interests of investors first and improve education, outreach and advocacy for investors.” Investor Office follows the merger of the former Office of the Investor and the Investor Education Fund (IEF), which took place earlier this year. It is headed by Tyler Fleming, who formerly handled communications and stakeholder relations at the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments (OBSI). See: Wanted: Commitment to support financial literacy for students “In all of our activities, we are determined to be an accessible and relatable voice for retail investors,” says Fleming. “Our mission is this: We’re here to give investors information to help them invest wisely and confidently, ensure their needs are understood by those who make the rules, and share their voice with the boardrooms of Bay Street.” Keywords Investor protectionCompanies Ontario Securities Commission The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) of Friday announced its rebranded Investor Office, which will spearhead the commission’s efforts at retail investor protection, education, and outreach. Investor Office will lead the OSC’s efforts in investor education, and advocate for investor protection within the commission. It also co-ordinates the regulator’s investor-focused initiatives, including working with the OSC’s Investor Advisory Panel (IAP) and developing content for the OSC’s consumer website. James Langton last_img read more

Weakness in commodities leads to rise in default rate: Moody’s

first_img Moody’s reports that 11 rated companies defaulted in July, pushing the year-to-date total to 102 defaults. The commodities sector remains the centre of default activity, it notes, as issuers face continued cash flow pressures as a result of low oil prices. Of the 62 commodities companies that have defaulted so far this year, 49 are in the oil and gas sector and 13 are in metals and mining. In July, seven oil and gas companies defaulted. By region, the defaults this year have been concentrated in North America, the Moody’s report says. So far, 80 North American issuers have defaulted, compared with 10 from Europe; the remaining 12 are from Asia, Latin America and Africa. Looking ahead, Moody’s expects the default rate to start declining in 2017. “In the month since U.K. voters opted to leave the European Union, high-yield spreads have returned to their pre-Brexit levels in both Europe and the U.S.,” says Sharon Ou, vice president and senior credit officer at Moody’s, in a statement. “This helps relieve the pressure on future default rates.” The Moody’s report also notes that there have been moderate improvements in the firm’s liquidity stress index, which also eases the default pressure. That said, “these measures currently stand at levels that suggest high-yield issuers remain vulnerable to any economic weakening,” Moody’s says. James Langton The default rate for global speculative-grade securities continued to rise in July and remains above the long-term average, according to a new report from New York-based Moody’s Investors Service Inc. The credit-rating agency reports that the trailing 12-month global speculative-grade default rate came in at 4.7% in July, up from 4.6% in June and remains above the long-term average of 4.2%. Moody’s expects the default rate to continue rising in the months ahead, peaking at 5.1% in November. Companies Moody’s Investors Service center_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

CU Law School appoints Brad Udall director of newly named Getches-Wilkinson Center

first_imgBrad Udall Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The University of Colorado Law School announced today that it is hiring Brad Udall as director of the newly renamed Natural Resources Law Center, which will now be called the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and Environment.“Colorado Law’s brand, mission and core values are intricately interlinked with leadership in natural resources, energy, and environmental law and policy,” Dean Phil Weiser said. “In the 1950s, Clyde Martz literally wrote the book in this area as a member of our faculty and he helped create the center in the early 1980s, along with our late Dean David Getches and others. Over the last 30 years, through a number of outstanding leaders and faculty members, including David Getches and Charles Wilkinson, the center has played a critical role in natural resources law and policy, particularly in the western United States.”The center’s new name honors Getches, who died shortly after stepping down as dean last year, and Charles Wilkinson, who is a legendary scholar, teacher and leader in natural resources policy and American Indian law as well as Getches’ longtime collaborator.“David and Charles were partners in the best sense of the word; it is a fitting honor to them both,” Weiser said. “I know that David would appreciate that they are honored together by renaming the center as a tribute to both of them,” said Mike Gheleta (Law ‘88), chair of the center’s advisory council, who was a student of both Getches and Wilkinson at Colorado Law in the 1980s.”Brad Udall is currently the director of the CU-Boulder–NOAA Western Water Assessment and brings a very successful career in natural resources policy to the helm of the Getches-Wilkinson Center. He will start as director of the center on April 1.“We conducted a nationwide search and we found the ideal candidate in our backyard,” said Associate Professor William Boyd, who led the search committee effort. “Brad is the whole package — a natural leader, a pragmatic and creative thinker, and someone who is deeply committed to solving our most pressing natural resources, energy and environmental problems. With his leadership and the strong support of the center’s advisory council and community, the Getches-Wilkinson Center is well-positioned to significantly enhance Colorado Law’s legacy of creative, interdisciplinary research; bold, inclusive teaching; and innovative problem solving.”“I am honored by the opportunity to work with such tremendous faculty members, an important legacy, and a center that bears the name of two giants in the field, David Getches and Charles Wilkinson,” Udall said. “I am also proud to follow in the footsteps of the center’s outstanding past directors, including outgoing Director Mark Squillace.”The center will host its annual Clyde Martz Conference on Aug. 15-16, focusing on the landmark California v. Arizona case and interstate water transfers. The center also will host its annual Schultz Lecture this fall and a new Martz Symposium in 2014. Finally, in collaboration with the Silicon Flatirons Center, the Getches-Wilkinson Center will host a conference on April 23 of this year comparing the prospects for dynamic markets in electric power, water and the wireless spectrum.To launch the Getches-Wilkinson Center, Udall, Weiser and others are planning an outreach effort to chart the newly named center’s future. For those who have supported the center in the past, and/or are interested to support its future, Chancellor Philip DiStefano has promised to match the first $1,000 of all contributions to the center made before March 31, 2013. Contributions may be made at http://www.cufund.org/gwcenter.Contact: Brad Udall, [email protected] Keri Ungemah, CU Law School communications, [email protected] “I am honored by the opportunity to work with such tremendous faculty members, an important legacy, and a center that bears the name of two giants in the field, David Getches and Charles Wilkinson,” said Brad Udall. “I am also proud to follow in the footsteps of the center’s outstanding past directors, including outgoing Director Mark Squillace.”center_img Categories:AcademicsLaw & PoliticsScience & TechnologyEnvironmentCampus CommunityNews Headlines Published: Jan. 24, 2013 last_img read more

TricorBraun WinePak Hires Derek Payne as Packaging Consultant

first_imgEmail Share ReddIt AdvertisementFairfield, CA (September 8, 2017) — TricorBraun WinePak, North America’s leading wine bottle distributor, has hired Derek Payne as a Packaging Consultant, according to Andrew Bottene, Senior Vice President at TricorBraun WinePak.“Derek has tremendous experience in packaging sales,” said Bottene. “He is a strong addition and will be focused on the British Columbia interior wine industry.”Prior to joining TricorBraun WinePak, Payne spent nearly 14 years at Universal Packaging: seven of those as Canadian Sales Manager. He has 25 years of experience in the packaging industry, with 11 of those in food and beverage, and chemical plastics. Payne also has 14 years of experience in the specialized field of container screen printing.“During the past 25 years, I’ve been fortunate to work with — and learn from — some really great professionals in this industry,” said Payne. “I’m excited to expand my experience and help drive new growth for TricorBraun WinePak.”“Our goal is to provide expertise on the full-spectrum of wine packaging issues, not just the bottle,” said Bottene. “Acquiring expert talent like Derek’s ensures that’s exactly what customers are provided.”TricorBraun WinePak has sales of more than $150 million and its Fairfield, California, facility features more than 360,000 square feet of warehouse space and a $2-million auto repacking system. The company has additional warehousing space throughout the major wine growing regions in America and Canada.TricorBraun WinePak is the largest wine bottle distributor in North America and a subsidiary of TricorBraun. With more than 115 years of experience, TricorBraun is one of the world’s leading suppliers of bottles, jars and other rigid packaging components with annual sales approaching $1 billion and more than 41 locations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. For more information, please contact Suzanne Fenton, VP, Brand Marketing at 314-983-2010, or at [email protected] Advertisement TAGSDerek PaynepeopleTricorBraun WinePak Twitter Linkedin Facebook Home Industry News Releases TricorBraun WinePak Hires Derek Payne as Packaging ConsultantIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessTricorBraun WinePak Hires Derek Payne as Packaging ConsultantBy Press Release – September 8, 2017 55 0 Previous articleAfternoon Brief, September 7Next articleTricorBraun WinePak Promotes Michelle Thornburn to Packaging Consultant Press Release Pinterestlast_img read more

Baron Francesco Ricasoli Presents #MadeInBrolio

first_imgEmail ReddIt TAGSBaron Francesco Ricasoli Home Industry News Releases Baron Francesco Ricasoli Presents #MadeInBrolioIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessBaron Francesco Ricasoli Presents #MadeInBrolioBy Press Release – May 8, 2020 247 0 AdvertisementVideo Storytelling Series Brings Tuscany’s Most Historic Winery into Your HomeNEW YORK, N.Y. – Beginning April 24, Baron Francesco Ricasoli will introduce #madeinBrolio—a video series that transports at-home viewers straight to Tuscany. The candid, one-to-two-minute videos will reveal behind-the-scenes footage of the historic Castello di Brolio: the inner workings of the people, vineyards, cellar, and secrets of the ancient castle. The #madeinBrolio series aims to reach those who are experiencing drastically different daily routines and offer some relief in the form of lighthearted content. The man behind the project, Francesco Ricasoli, explains: “I would like to convey a message of beauty and hope to all those who hold Italy near and dear. We plan to take viewers along with us in our journey and introduce them to our world. Travel and wine enthusiasts will have a story to remember about Tuscany, even in the year 2020.”More than ten videos are already in development, with the first one launching today.  Viewers can find subsequent videos announced and posted on the Francesco Ricasoli @francescoricasoli and @Ricasoli1141 Instagram pages, as well as on Facebook and Youtube, always accompanied by the hashtag #madeinBrolio.The Ricasoli family and their Tuscan estate, Castello di Brolio, have been indisputable leaders in Chianti Classico since 1141. Each year, this magical and historic destination attracts more than fifty thousand visitors from around the world. With the international lockdown currently in place, travelers and wine lovers who can no longer experience the unmistakable beauty of Tuscany in person can tune in to #madeinBrolio and virtually experience the unique world of Chianti Classico and Castello di Brolio. For more information about the #madeinBrolio video series or to request an interview with Francesco Ricasoli, please contact Emma Mrkonic ([email protected]).About Ricasoli 1141Ricasoli is the most historic and representative wine producer in Chianti Classico DOCG. Francesco Ricasoli, the 32nd Baron and owner, leads the estate and winery where he continues the Ricasoli family legacy. The Brolio estate extends over 3,000 acres north of Siena, including 580 acres dedicated to Sangiovese. Castello di Brolio is an idyllic destination for wine and hospitality, offering guided wine tours, an Osteria with seasonal Tuscan fare, and scenic guesthouse accommodations. Ricasoli produces an exceptional range including four Gran Selezione wines, along with Chianti Classico, Chianti Classico Riserva, and Toscana IGT labels. For more information about Ricasoli, please visit www.ricasoli.com.Advertisement Twitter Linkedin Share Previous articleChicagoland Winery Raises $8K for Neighboring Businesses During PandemicNext articleHall to Host Virtual Cabernet Cookoff ‘Home Edition’ on Saturday, May 30 Press Release Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

Programme to Strengthen Capacity of INDECOM gets $84.9 Million Boost

first_imgAdvertisements Programme to Strengthen Capacity of INDECOM gets $84.9 Million Boost National SecurityMay 16, 2012 RelatedProgramme to Strengthen Capacity of INDECOM gets $84.9 Million Boost RelatedProgramme to Strengthen Capacity of INDECOM gets $84.9 Million Boost By Latonya Linton, JIS Reporter RelatedProgramme to Strengthen Capacity of INDECOM gets $84.9 Million Boost FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A sum of $84.9 million has been allocated to the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Accountability Programme in the 2012/13 Estimates of Expenditure now before the House of Representatives. The programme aims to strengthen the investigative capacity of the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM) and to fulfil its mandate of external oversight of the JCF. The allocation for 2012/13 will go towards the recruitment of a ballistic expert and a Deputy Commissioner; purchase and deployment of forensic unit and evidence collection equipment; and design of a communication strategy. The programme is being funded under a grant from the United Kingdom (UK) Department for International Development and is scheduled to be completed by March 2015.last_img read more

Faster Processsing for Arriving Passengers

first_imgRelatedJCF Observes Police Week from November 23 To 29 Faster Processsing for Arriving Passengers National SecurityNovember 28, 2014Written by: Garfield Angus RelatedJCF Receives Non-Lethal Equipment As part of a $200 million airport improvement project, the Government has installed five automated immigration kiosks to process airline passengers arriving at the Norman Manley International Airport, in Kingston, and 10 at the Sangster International Airport, in Montego Bay.This will speed up the processing time to about 60 seconds, down from the current average of two minutes. Immigration Officers will monitor the system, and intervene where necessary.Speaking at the launch of the kiosks at the Norman Manley International Airport, on November 27,  Minister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting, said the system is designed to detect persons’ travel history, and to easily identify those who present health risks, and are of interest to law enforcement.“While this development will reduce physical interaction between immigration and passengers, we are confident that the security of the nation will not be compromised,” the Minister said, noting that the kiosks work in conjunction with an Advance Passenger Information System (APIS), and aid the work of the Passport, Immigration and Citizenship Agency (PICA).“It allows PICA to continue to detect persons of interest by cross referencing incoming passengers against the nation’s watch list, and conducting appropriate security checks by a built-in matrix,” Mr. Bunting added.Persons who can use the system are: Jamaican nationals with a valid passport, visitors who possess electronic passport with biometric information; Caribbean nationals who are members of CARICOM, and visitors from the United Kingdom (UK), Canada and the United States, with machine readable travel documents.Passengers not able to use the system are those who require visas; families with children under the age of 18 years; users of wheelchairs; and holders of any type of permits. They will have to use the primary line.Funding for the five-year airport improvement project is provided by the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF). Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting (3rd left), displays a receipt generated by one of the automated immigration kiosks installed at the two international airports to process arriving passengers. Occasion was the launch of the kiosks on November 27, at the Norman Manley International Airport, in Kingston. Others (from left) are: Chief Executive Officer of the Passport, Immigration and Citizenship Agency (PICA), Jennifer McDonald; Permanent Secretary in the National Security Ministry, Major General Stewart Saunders, and Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment, Jennifer Griffith. RelatedPassport Immigration and Citizenship Agency for Emancipation Parkcenter_img Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsAs part of a $200 million airport improvement project, the Government has installed five automated immigration kiosks to process airline passengers arriving at the Norman Manley International Airport, in Kingston, and 10 at the Sangster International Airport, in Montego Bay.This will speed up the processing time to about 60 seconds, down from the current average of two minutes. Immigration Officers will monitor the system, and intervene where necessary.Persons who can use the system are: Jamaican nationals with a valid passport, visitors who possess electronic passport with biometric information; Caribbean nationals who are members of CARICOM, and visitors from the United Kingdom (UK), Canada and the United States, with machine readable travel documents. Faster Processsing for Arriving PassengersJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaylast_img read more

When Alfred Russel Wallace Spoke to Me

first_img Photo: Statue of Alfred Russel Wallace, by George Beccaloni / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0).I was born forty years after Alfred Russel Wallace died. So obviously my life never intersected with the life of the man who, with Charles Darwin, discovered the theory of evolution by natural selection. But the beauty of reading is that figures from the past can still speak to us, and happily, by the time I was a young college student Wallace spoke to me.  Intelligent Design When Alfred Russel Wallace Spoke to MeMichael FlannerySeptember 9, 2020, 1:26 PM Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Michael FlanneryFellow, Center for Science and CultureMichael A. Flannery is professor emeritus of UAB Libraries, University of Alabama at Birmingham. He holds degrees in library science from the University of Kentucky and history from California State University, Dominguez Hills. He has written and taught extensively on the history of medicine and science. His most recent research interest has been on the co-discoverer of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913). He has edited Alfred Russel Wallace’s Theory of Intelligent Evolution: How Wallace’s World of Life Challenged Darwinism (Erasmus Press, 2008) and authored Alfred Russel Wallace: A Rediscovered Life (Discovery Institute Press, 2011). His research and work on Wallace continues. Share Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Wallace went on to challenge and break with Darwin over what I’ve called “intelligent evolution,” a forerunner of modern intelligent design, as readers of my book, Intelligent Evolution: How Alfred Russel Wallace’s World of Life Challenged Darwinism, will be aware. He came to me indirectly, through William Irwin Thompson’s At the Edge of History. When I was a freshman in 1972 that book was hot off the presses, and making its impression upon those of us who were avid readers and interested in thinking outside the box. Purpose and Meaning TagsA. P. MeadAlfred Russel WallaceAt the Edge of HistoryCharles DarwinDarwinian evolutionevolutionintelligent evolutionliberalsLoren EiseleyLouis PasteurM. R. A. Chancemeaningnatural selectionPithecanthropuspurposesurvival of the fittestThe World of LifeWilliam Irwin Thompson,Trending “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Evolution Recommended Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Thompson’s book certainly exposed me to new ideas, and Darwin’s reigning paradigm at the time found itself in his crosshairs. I thought (like Thompson once did) that only backwater hicks and assorted religious extremists seriously questioned Darwinian evolution. But Thompson shook my presumptions and certainties: And, in fact, this kind of snobbery seems to have been one of the historical conditions which enabled the theory to triumph: the Victorian liberals were quick to champion the new theory because it helped them put the staid, port-sipping, fox-hunting, Tory clergy in its place. Loren Eiseley has recalled how vehemently Darwin reacted to Wallace’s questioning of their joint theory. Even at the time of its formulation Wallace wondered why, if survival of the fittest was the mechanism of natural selection, man ever evolved a brain a hundred times more complex than that needed for survival. “‘No adequate explanation,’ they [Eiseley quoting M. R. A. Chance and A. P. Mead] confess over eight years after Darwin scrawled his vigorous ‘No’ upon Wallace’s paper, ‘has been put forward to account for so large a cerebrum in man’.” Five hundred thousand years ago, Pithecanthropus “evolved” with an explosion of brain size and frontal development. Since there are more primitive man-apes farther back, in the few remains of bones we have, it is tempting to connect the dots in a line that cuts across all the dimensions of plentiful space. It is all the more tempting to connect the dots in this way if one is living in an empire that places the white race at the end of a long line of progress in which the darker races are but bestial prefigurings of the Englishman. And if one lives in an economic system in which the market is red in tooth and claw, it is tempting to think that laissez faire and survival of the fittest are part of nature’s way. Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis I never looked at Darwinian evolution in quite the same way after that, and although Wallace receded into the deep recesses of my memory, I had what Pasteur called “the prepared mind” to take in what Wallace had to tell me in The World of Life when I was happily reacquainted with him. That was some 15 years ago.  I invite you to join me on my intellectual journey. My carefully edited and introduced abridgment of that work will bring you into Wallace’s rich world of purpose and meaning. Get Intelligent Evolution today! The “Edge of History”last_img read more

Fewer Contractors Benefiting from Fire Season

first_img Email Firefighters in the Flathead Valley and across Montana are preparing for the summer fire season, but some private contractors are concerned they won’t be able to find work due to wet conditions and the dispatching policies of government agencies. According to the National Interagency Fire Center, the potential for wildfire in the Northern Rockies will be below normal in July and August, thanks to a deep snowpack in the mountains. “If there is no fire, there’s no work,” said Steve Gist, owner of Gist Enterprises, LLC, a private contractor based in Whitefish. Gist is also concerned that dispatching policies used by the Northern Rockies Coordinating Group, which coordinates firefighting efforts in the region at the federal, state and local levels, are preventing private contractors from getting called to jobs. According to Tim Murphy, contractor liaison for the coordinating group, federal and state employed firefighters and equipment are the first dispatched to any wildfire in the region. After those resources are depleted, local fire departments are called and finally private contractors. Murphy said that this policy was established by the coordinating group’s board of directors in 2005. But Gist, who is a director of the Northern Rockies Wildfire Contractors Association, said this dispatching order is unfair to private contractors and that local fire departments shouldn’t be responding to fires outside of their area. “There are a lot of good cooperatives out there and I have a lot of respect for volunteer firefighters, but we don’t think those departments should be driving across the state,” he said. Troy Kurth is also an association member and general manager for Rocky Mountain Fire Company in Missoula. He echoed concerns about the current dispatching order and asked what would happen when a local fire department couldn’t respond to a fire in their area because resources had been sent elsewhere. “The local fire department equipment is there to protect local people and property and is paid for by local taxpayers,” Kurth said. “We ask that they call contractors before stretching the resources of local government.” Murphy responded that the final decision for a local department to go out of their area is made by the fire chief and that, in most cases, they would only allow some equipment and personnel to leave the area when wildfire conditions were low. Mike Kopitzke, acting manager for the government coordinating group, said the organization views federal, state and local agencies as the same and government resources are used before private resources. “Our policy says we should send government resources before private contractors,” he said. “When we’ve exhausted government resources, we send in the contractors.” But Gist and the contractors association are concerned that this policy could be harmful to the contractors and when there is a bad fire season there will be fewer resources. “When we look at the big picture, some of the contractors out there are going out of business or quitting and when we have a big season, we’re going to be in big trouble,” he said. “We’re not going to have the manpower or resources.” In 2010 Gist’s company, which consists of four trucks and 12 employees, only got 10 days of work. In 2007 they worked almost 200. Gist attributed this to both weak fire seasons in recent years and the dispatching policies. Last month the contractors association met with the coordinating group and the government agencies it represents, including the U.S. Forest Service and Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, and voiced its concerns. Gist, Kurth and other contractors all hoped the policy would be changed and that private contractors would be sent to fires before local fire departments from other areas. Murphy said the coordinating group’s board of directors would be meeting this week to discuss the concerns. Kurth was hopeful the issue would be resolved before this year’s fire season and that everyone would be satisfied with the outcome. “I think that the system in Montana and the Northern Rockies is the best and we have a great relationship with all of the agencies,” he said. “I think it’ll be resolved in the professional manner.” Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

Micheál Martin disciplines party figures over candidate ‘launch’ in North

first_img Micheál Martin disciplines party figures over candidate ‘launch’ in North Fianna Fáil has handed out punishment to the Senator who launched a candidate in Northern Ireland before the party was ready. Mark Daly has been sacked from his Deputy Leader role in the Seanad and has been removed as spokesperson for the Irish Overseas and the Diaspora.Senator Daly and TD Éamon Ó Cuiv presented Sorcha McAnespy as Fianna Fáil’s first council candidate in the North last month without approval from HQ.It remains to be seen if there will be any sanction for Éamon Ó Cuiv for his involvement in the incident. Homepage BannerNews Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Facebook Previous articleTribunal recommends solicitor be struck off after diverting client fundsNext articleOllie Horgan among PFAI Manager of the Year nominees News Highland Twittercenter_img Twitter WhatsApp Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic By News Highland – November 7, 2018 Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterestlast_img read more

News / Congestion crisis outgrows ports as container stacks pop up across the UK

first_imgThe Elbstrom at Portsmouth One UK freight forwarder told The Loadstar the PPE shipments “can’t get into the National Health Service (NHS) supply network – it’s already full”.Meanwhile, the country’ major container gateways continue to struggle with empty containers causing congestion, and other UK ports are offering their services to shipping lines desperate to get empties back to Asia.Last week, Portsmouth terminal Portico welcomed the 974 teu BG Freight Line feeder vessel Elbstrom, which made an ad hoc call at the south coast port to collect a consignment of empty CMA CGM containers for transport to Rotterdam.“The ongoing effect of the coronavirus pandemic, along with some British ports seeing container traffic 30% above normal levels has led to a glut of empty containers across the UK. Combine this with importers looking to stock up ahead of Christmas, and you’ve got a major container headache,” the company said.Portico operations director Steve Williams said: “We’re pleased we can do our bit to help solve this issue, which is causing disruption to supply chains across the globe and hampering the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.” By Gavin van Marle 16/11/2020center_img The container congestion crisis engulfing the UK has spread beyond the country’s ports and distribution centres into towns and villages.To say residents in the sleepy Suffolk village of Melton, located about 10 miles inland from Felixstowe, were surprised to see large numbers of container trucks turning up on a disused plot of land over the past week would be an understatement.Pictures and video taken by The Loadstar over the weekend show container stacks dominating the rural skyline – The Loadstar estimates hundreds of containers are being stored at the site.The build-up of containers at the site comes amid reports that some 11,000 teu of containers containing PPE shipments are stuck in Felixstowe’s container yards.last_img read more

Cheetahs made to sweat over Pokomela

first_img MoneyMorningPaperThe 10 Richest Families Of The World. Especially No. 6 Is A Complete Surprise.MoneyMorningPaper|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Posted in Cheetahs, News, Super Rugby, Top headlines Tagged Cheetahs, Griquas, Junior, NEWS Post by SA Rugby magazine Cheetahs made to sweat over Pokomela 熱門話題對肚腩脂肪感到後悔!試了在萬寧賣的這個後…熱門話題|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘ The Cheetahs could head into their last Super Rugby Unlocked match against Griquas on Saturday without captain Junior Pokomela.The Cheetahs host Griquas in Bloemfontein but, at the team announcement on Thursday, coach Hawies Fourie was forced to bracket the provisional selection of Pokomela at blindside flank with that of Aidon Davis.It’s believed Pokomela aggravated a pre-existing wrist injury he had been playing with over the past two weeks. He will undergo scans on Thursday to determine the extent of the injury and his availability for the match against Griquas.Should he be ruled out, Davis will start at blindside flank and lock Carl Wegner will take over the captaincy.Meanwhile, Fourie has made three other changes to the starting lineup, where Rhyno Smith replaces Malcolm Jaer on the wing, Howard Mnisi takes over from William Small-Smith at outside centre and Cheetahs debutant Hencus van Wyk starts at tighthead prop.Cheetahs – 15 Clayton Blommetjies, 14 Rhyno Smith, 13 Howard Mnisi, 12 Frans Steyn, 11 Rosko Specman, 10 Tian Schoeman, 9 Tian Meyer, 8 Jeandré Rudolph, 7 Junior Pokomela (c)/Aidon Davis, 6 Andisa Ntsila, 5 Carl Wegner, 4 Ian Groenewald, 3 Hencus van Wyk, 2 Reinach Venter, 1 Boan Venter.Subs: 16 Jacques du Toit, 17 Cameron Dawson, 18 Khutha Mchunu, 19 Oupa Mohoje, 20 Aidon Davis/Chris Massyn, 21 Ruben de Haas, 22 Reinhardt Fortuin, 23 William Small-Smith.Griquas – 15 Masixole Banda, 14 Ederies Arendse, 13 Harlon Klaasen, 12 Johnathan Francke, 11 Eduan Keyter, 10 Tinus de Beer, 9 Zak Burger, 8 Carl Els, 7 Stefan Willemse, 6 Gideon van der Merwe, 5 Cameron Lindsay, 4 Adré Smith, 3 Ewald van der Westhuizen, 2 HJ Luus, 1 Mox Mxoli.Subs: Monde Hadebe, Andrew Beerwinkel, Madot Mabokela, Ewan Coetzee, CJ Velleman, Theo Maree, André Swarts, Daniel Kasende, Bandisa Ndlovu, Sibabalo Qoma, Ashlon Davids.Photo: Getty Images Five one-cap Boks that could still represent South AfricaSA Rugby Magazine takes a look at five players who have only represented South Africa once but might do so again in the future.SA Rugby MagUndoLife Exact BrazilGrace Jones Is Now 72 Years Old, This Is Her NowLife Exact Brazil|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCNAHow is life for Cambodian boy linguist after viral fame?CNA|SponsoredSponsoredUndoSumabisThis Is What Happens To Your Body If You Sleep With Socks OnSumabis|SponsoredSponsoredUndo熱門話題不要被酵素騙了!在萬寧賣的「這個」直接針對脂肪…熱門話題|SponsoredSponsoredUndoLoans | Search AdsLooking for loan in Hong Kong? Find options hereLoans | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘ ‘ AlphaCuteOprah’s New House Cost $90 Million, And This Is What It Looks LikeAlphaCute|SponsoredSponsoredUndoWorld Cup-winning Bok quartet in Eddie Jones’ all-time XVSA Rugby MagUndoWatch: Kolbe makes Test players look amateur – Ugo MonyeSA Rugby MagUndoGoGoPeak10 Most Beautiful Cities You Should Visit Once In Your LifetimeGoGoPeak|SponsoredSponsoredUndocenter_img From the magazine: Jano Vermaak names his Perfect XVSA Rugby MagUndo ‘ ‘  103  12 BuzzAura16 Cancer Causing Foods You Probably Eat Every DayBuzzAura|SponsoredSponsoredUndo New Cheetahs captain Junior Pokomela ‘ Published on November 19, 2020 last_img read more

Global game companies have claimed millions through Video Game Tax Relief in UK

first_img 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now. Global game companies have claimed millions through Video Game Tax Relief in UKTIGA defends scheme, saying it would be “very limiting” if large international companies could not benefitHaydn TaylorSenior Staff WriterWednesday 2nd October 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareAs the bill for Video Games Tax Relief (VGTR) in the UK has risen to over £100 million per year, it has been revealed that large multinational companies have been cashing in on the scheme. According to an investigation by The Guardian, companies like Sony, WarnerMedia, and Sega have claimed nearly half of all VGTR since the sceheme was launched. US-based WarnerMedia, which owns British devs Rocksteady and Travellers Tales, has apparently claimed up to £60 million in tax relief. Meanwhile, Japanese firms Sony and Sega have reportedly claimed almost £30 million and £20 million respectively for their UK-based operations. VGTR was introduced in 2014, after years of campaigning spearheaded by industry trade association TIGA. At the time, then chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne said: “This is a key industry of the future and I want Britain to be one of its biggest centres. 95% of UK video games companies in the UK are [small and medium-sized enterprises].”This relief is one of the most generous in the world and will help them to grow, creating new jobs for hardworking people.”Since then, TIGA figures suggest employment in the games sector has increased from nearly 10,000 to over 14,000 as of November 2018. Additionally, studio numbers have increased during the same time period from 620 to 812. In order to be eligible for tax relief, a game must pass a points-based “cultural test.” This includes critera like having European characters and locations, or being primarily developed in Europe. Under the system, it is entirely possible for a game like Batman: Arkham Knight to pass the test, despite lacking any obviously European cultural elements. Although the test criteria has been approved by both the EU and the British government, the European Commission only agreed after concerns were abated that the scheme wouldn’t be exploited. In 2014 Joaquín Almunia, EU Commission vice president in charge of competition policy, said: “Our initial doubts have been dispelled. The proposed aid for video games is indeed focusing on a small number of distinctive, culturally British games which have increasing difficulties to find private financing.”Speaking with The Guardian, Alex Dunnagan — a researcher with investigative think tank TaxWatch UK — said the scheme had “become a cash cow for large, tax-dodging multinational corporations who are milking the system to extract hundreds of millions of pounds in subsidies from the British taxpayer.”TIGA CEO Dr Richard Wilson said the generous tax relief plan was primarily responsible for recent industry growth, and refuted the idea that VGTR was not intended to support large international companies making games in the UK. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “It would have been very limiting… if those large companies hadn’t benefited as well, because they are all part of the same ecosystem,” he told GamesIndustry.biz. “So I think it’s right that they benefit”He added: “If VGTR was cancelled or removed, it would be catastrophic to the UK games industry. It would take us back to square one, where we were competing on a very unlevel playing field. In fact, the situation would be worse now, because there are other EU countries looking into tax relief.”This report comes after it was revealed earlier this year that Rockstar has not paid any net corporation tax in the last ten years, and has unpaid claims approved for over £40 million in VGTR. Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA leans on Apex Legends and live services in fourth quarterQ4 and full year revenues close to flat and profits take a tumble, but publisher’s bookings still up double-digitsBy Brendan Sinclair 2 hours agoEA Play Live set for July 22Formerly E3-adjacent event moves to take place a month and half after the ESA’s showBy Jeffrey Rousseau 3 hours agoLatest comments (3)Nick Gibson Director, Games Investor ConsultingA year ago I acknowledge that correlation is not causation but, to expand on what Richard Wilson said, VGTR’s introduction in 2014 appears to have coincided with a material change in fortunes for the UK games development industry. We’ve tracked UK games development headcount most years since 2008 (published in TIGA’s regular Making Games In The UK reports) and the data is quite stark:UK games developer headcount growth from Jul 2008 to Dec 2013 = -0.001%.UK games developer headcount growth from Dec 2013 to Nov 2018 = 45%. 7Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyEwan Lamont CEO, Legendary GamesA year ago I don’t begrudge any company legally claiming what they are due but the relief is set up to make it easy for the big guys and not the small. The key issue is it just copies the film tax relief template, which is not suitable for studios that work on multiple small projects and it is hard and often not possible to claim if you are R&D focused and claiming R&D tax credits. This should be a massive issue for our trade bodies to be acting on but there is unfortunately little if any interest in issues that effect studios with sub 50 members. We should be lobbying for harmonisation with the R&D tax relief so it can be claimed by all UK Devs.center_img 6Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyChristopher Dring Publisher, GamesIndustry.bizA year ago Lots of short memories going on. It’s worth remembering the state of UK games development 10 years ago when big companies were exiting the UK and investing in other markets, namely Canada.It’s sad to see the idea that tax relief for a Batman game is viewed negatively, when the same doesn’t appear to be the case for a Star Wars film.last_img read more

Nearly 20% of Australia’s PV home systems substandard, watchdog finds

first_imgNearly 20% of Australia’s PV home systems substandard, watchdog findsUp to 200,000 photovoltaic units on homes across Australia could be improperly installed and some even posing a danger, according to the country’s Clean Energy Regulator. May 27, 2013 pv magazine Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Australia’s Clean Energy Regulator estimates that up to 200,000 solar panel systems on homes throughout the country may have been improperly installed.While Australia boasts more than a million homes installed with photovoltaic systems throughout the country, the federal watchdog reckons nearly 20% could be in less than acceptable condition.The regulator conducted random checks on 7,000 photovoltaic units and determined 19% were substandard and in need of repairs and shut down 4% of the systems on the spot, saying they were found to be unsafe. Based on the review, the regulator estimates that 190,000 systems could be in poor condition and up to 40,000 units possibly posing a danger, according to a report in the Sydney Morning Herald.Speaking to a parliamentary committee on the matter, Andrew Livingston, the Clean Energy Regulator’s executive general manager in charge of renewables and carbon farming, said installers had reacted quickly to requests to repair the substandard or unsafe photovoltaic units, the newspaper said. While the watchdog lacks the power to force installers to make the necessary repairs, it can fine the licensed agents who contracted installers for the jobs up to A$3,500 ($3,378, €2,610).Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Graphene aluminum ion batteries with ultra-fast charging Blake Matich 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The “graphene revolution” is almost here. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print The more you know Marian Willuhn 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Module-level power electronics, most often in the form of power optimizers and microinverters, offer a range of value pr… Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. Australia’s next wave of large-scale solar development pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Call it “latent energy” – Australia’s renewable resources are expected to help some of the world’s greatest polluters to… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… Unchained: political moves shift solar supply David Wagman 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com PV module supply chains to the U.S. industry are in flux, and not for the first time. Moves to take action alongside sti… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Oiling the economy

first_imgDespite the surprising slowdown and financial sector in a deep mess, the government went unheeded in arresting the economic slide. Practically very complex view has been presented for the income tax structure and no announcement on the stimulus by the government resulted in Sensex going down by large points. But the government is hopeful in achieving 6.5 growth rate and it appears to be projected with 2.1 LACS CRORES disinvestment. The government is oblivious to market condition and reaction of the people when the time comes to sell off the assets. The government is milking cash from the companies and leaving them hapless as the companies cannot plan for capital expenditure. The government is forced to reduce the food and fertiliser subsidies because when GST is becoming troublesome the compensation not paid to States can bounce back and taint the image of the BJP and hence discounts the prospects of an election in the States. It is the same political narrative which prompted the BJP to keep repeating it and win the hearts of the people. But why BJP cannot understand that people could enjoy the political winning without providing employment and generating income. The States are reluctant to stand with BJP in difficult days. Therefore for some time BJP must give rest to high voltage political decisions because in the past political decisions have proved disruptive to national peace and harmony. When the level of peace is low the economic pitch will also be low. The government must understand this point. After all economic prosperity should precede the political stronghold. It has happened many times in the past when the investment is flooded but since this time consumption has been affected battery the investment should have not served any purpose. The role of the government was ominous and either personal income tax should have been relaxed or stimulus in the rural area was needed but the government is not confident of collecting GST as projected. The government has found itself in a tight spot because GST collection and uncertainty about the GST rates are still unresolved. In case the council comes up with prudent slabs the scene can be different. The stimulus was must at this stage.last_img read more